Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Food and Water Watch Launch Fair Farm Bill Campaign in Ohio

Food & Water Watch

Food & Water Watch is proud to announce its Fair Farm Bill Campaign meetings in Cleveland, Columbus and Toledo.

Right now, our country’s food system is broken. A few large companies, like Cargill and Monsanto, control every part of it—risking public health, pushing out small and mid-sized farmers and hurting the environment. In driving out the smaller producers who should be the backbone of American agriculture, these corporations are also depriving consumers of access to safe and affordable food. Monopoly control of our food system threatens public health, the environment and fair markets for American farmers.

The good news is that we can make our food system work better for small farmers and our communities, and give consumers access to safer, more sustainable food. This winter, Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) has the opportunity to level the playing field for small farmers through the Farm Bill. The Farm Bill is the most important piece of agricultural legislation that determines how food reaches our plate. Brown is on the Agricultural Committee and we need to show him that Ohioans want him to stand up for small farmers and local, sustainable food.

At Food & Water Watch, we believe that everyone has a right to safe, healthy and affordable food. We are very excited to announce this kick-off event of our new Fair Farm Bill Campaign. With the help of the people in Ohio, we can fix our broken food system. We invite everyone to join us at our Fair Farm Bill Kick Off Meetings in the Cleveland, Columbus and Toledo areas.

Cleveland Fair Farm Bill Campaign Kickoff Meeting
Cleveland Heights Lee Road Library
Meeting Room A
Tuesday, Jan. 17  •  7:30 - 8:30 p.m.
2345 Lee Rd., Cleveland Heights Ohio 44118

Guest Speaker: Nick Swetye, City Fresh

RSVP and come to the Fair Farm Bill Campaign Kickoff Meeting to learn how you can help.

Columbus Fair Farm Bill Campaign Kickoff Meeting
Bexley Public Library
Auditorium in the Basement
Thursday, Jan. 19  •  7 - 8 p.m.
2411 E Main St., Columbus, Ohio 43209

Contact Chris: Chris@greencorps.org for more information

Toledo Fair Farm Bill Campaign Kickoff Meeting
United Way Building

Thursday, Jan. 19  •  5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
1 Stranahan Square, Toledo, Ohio 43604

Contact Adam: adam@greencorps.org for more information

Refreshments will be provided at the kickoff meetings.

For more information, contact Tia Lebherz at tia@greencorps.org and click here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

polaristest / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner

Over six gallons of water are required to produce one gallon of wine. "Irrigation, sprays, and frost protection all [used in winemaking] require a lot of water," explained winemaker and sommelier Keith Wallace, who's also a professor and the founder of the Wine School of Philadelphia, the largest independent wine school in the U.S. And water waste is just the start of the climate-ruining inefficiencies commonplace in the wine industry. Sustainably speaking, climate change could be problematic for your favorite glass of wine.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Spinach is a true nutritional powerhouse, as it's rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Jeff Turrentine

From day to day, our public health infrastructure — the people and systems we've put in place to keep populations, as opposed to individuals, healthy — largely goes unnoticed. That's because when it's working well, its success takes the form of utter normalcy.

Read More Show Less
Spring Break vs. COVID19: The Real Impact of Ignoring Social Distancing

By Eoin Higgins

A viral video showing cell phone data collected by location accuracy company X-Mode from spring break partiers potentially spreading the coronavirus around the U.S. has brought up questions of digital privacy even as it shows convincingly the importance of staying home to defeat the disease.

Read More Show Less
Aerial shot top view Garbage trucks unload garbage to a recycle in the vicinity of the city of Bangkok, Thailand. bugto / Moment / Getty Images

German researchers have identified a strain of bacterium that not only breaks down toxic plastic, but also uses it as food to fuel the process, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less