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Sunshine State Finally Lives Up to Its Name

Energy

An overwhelming majority of voters in Florida approved a measure which provides tax breaks on solar installations for residential and business owners.

Amendment 4, which received unanimous support from both chambers of the state legislature, will make rooftop solar cheaper and support its expansion. The Sunshine State is currently 14th nationwide in installed solar capacity, though it ranks third in rooftop solar potential.

Florida will vote on another measure in November, utility-backed Amendment 1, which could make net metering unattractive in the state.

"The Sunshine State is finally living up to its name," said Sean Gallagher, vice president of state affairs at the Solar Energy Industries Association. "This vote sends a strong signal that Florida is open for business and the well-paying jobs and economic benefits that solar provides.

"Amendment 4 removes financial barriers to smart local investment. It's clear, Floridians want better access to affordable, clean energy options and this vote is a significant step in the right direction.

"Now it's time to keep the momentum going. To ensure a bright solar future for Florida, customers should vote NO on Amendment 1, the anti-solar amendment that will be on Florida ballots this November."

For a deeper dive:

News: CBS Local, Florida Today, WLRN, Orlando Sentinel

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