Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Climate Change Blamed as Flooding Forces Thousands to Evacuate in Canada

Climate
Canadian police officers stand a boat on a flooded street in suburbs of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on April 28, 2019. SEBASTIEN ST-JEAN / AFP / Getty Images

Flooding in four Canadian provinces has forced thousands of people to evacuate, and leaders across the country are blaming climate change.

Communities in Manitoba, New Brunswick, Ontario and Quebec are all impacted and both Montreal and Ottawa have declared states of emergency, CTV news reported Saturday. The flooding comes just two years after heavy rain and snowmelt contributed to the worst floods in decades in Ontario and Quebec, according to Global News.


"This flooding is happening here in Quebec, it's happening in Ontario, it's happening in New Brunswick. And really sadly, what we thought was one-in-100-year floods are now happening every five years, in this case, every two years," Environment Minister Catherine McKenna said Thursday, according to Global News. "I remember sandbagging with folks in both Ontario and Quebec just two years ago … people whose houses were being affected whose lives are being affected. We know that climate change is real … we are going to continue to see this."

Flood records have been broken along some parts of the Ottawa river, and more records are expected to break in coming days, CBC reported Sunday. The Ottawa River Regulating Committee predicted water levels would peak Tuesday or Wednesday. Records are already being broken in Lac Coulonge, Arnprior and Ottawa.

"They say it's 100-year storms — well it's a few years later and we're back in the same boat," Ontario Premier Doug Ford said Friday, according to Global News. "Something is going on and we have to be conscious of it."

The city of Montreal extended a state of emergency for another five days on Sunday, Global News reported. The city expects to see water levels continue to rise Monday and Tuesday, as residents and authorities are working to prevent dikes from failing in some areas.

In Pierrefonds, water levels have surpassed the 2017 levels and residents are working to hold back the waters by building a 0.5 kilometer (approximately 0.3 miles) dike on top of a permanent dirt dike.

Allison Hanes warned in The Montreal Gazette that this could be the "new normal" for the region:

Although Pierrefonds borough Mayor Jim Beis says lessons from 2017 and quick action have protected hundreds of homes this time around, the flooding is already worse in some areas and the toll already higher than the calamity of 2017.

We are in uncharted waters. But the really scary part is that this could be the new normal — a terrifying new reality that has long been foretold, but is now upon us.

Canadian Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale explained why climate change makes historic flooding more likely, as Global News reported.

"This is one of the most obvious manifestations of a changing climate," Goodale said. "More unstable weather conditions where you can get precipitation that dumps years worth of moisture in a day or two. And then it all floods and causes enormous damage to private property as well as public infrastructure, as well as the economy."

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A mostly empty 110 freeway toward downtown Los Angeles, California on April 28, 2020. Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The shelter in place orders that brought clean skies to some of the world's most polluted cities and saw greenhouse gas emissions plummet were just a temporary relief that provided an illusory benefit to the long-term consequences of the climate crisis. According to new research, the COVID-19 lockdowns will have a "neglible" impact on global warming, as Newshub in New Zealand reported.

Read More Show Less
Centrosaurus apertus was a plant-eating, single-horned dinosaur that lived 76 to 77 million years ago. Sergey Krasovskiy / Stocktrek Images / Getty Images

Scientists have discovered and diagnosed the first instance of malignant cancer in a dinosaur, and they did so by using modern medical techniques. They published their results earlier this week in The Lancet Oncology.

Read More Show Less
Parks keep people happy in times of global crisis, economic shutdown and public anger. NPS

By Joe Roman and Taylor Ricketts

The COVID-19 pandemic in the United States is the deepest and longest period of malaise in a dozen years. Our colleagues at the University of Vermont have concluded this by analyzing posts on Twitter. The Vermont Complex Systems Center studies 50 million tweets a day, scoring the "happiness" of people's words to monitor the national mood. That mood today is at its lowest point since 2008 when they started this project.

Read More Show Less
The ubiquity of guns and bullets poses environmental risks. Contaminants in bullets include lead, copper, zinc, antimony and mercury. gorancakmazovic / iStock / Getty Images Plus

New York State Attorney General Letitia James announced Thursday that she will attempt to dismantle the National Rifle Association (NRA), arguing that years of corruption and mismanagement warrant the dissolution of the activist organization, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less
Bystanders watch the MV Wakashio bulk carrier from which oil is leaking near Blue Bay Marine Park in southeast Mauritius, on August 6, 2020. Photo by Dev Ramkhelawon / L'Express Maurice / AFP / Getty Images

The Indian Ocean island of Mauritius, renowned for its coral reefs, is facing an unprecedented ecological catastrophe after a tanker ran aground offshore and began leaking oil.

Read More Show Less
A mural honors the medics fighting COVID-19 in Australia, where cases are once again rising, taken on April 22, 2020 in Melbourne, Australia. Robert Cianflone / Getty Images

By Gianna-Carina Grün

While the first countries are easing their lockdowns, others are reporting more and more new cases every day. Data for the global picture shows the pandemic is far from over. DW has the latest statistics.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Hannah Watters wrote on Twitter that she was suspended for posting a video and photo of crowded hallways at her high school. hannah @ihateiceman

As the debate over how and if to safely reopen schools in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic continues, two student whistleblowers have been caught in the crosshairs.

Read More Show Less