Quantcast

Floating Solar-Powered Eco-Home Is 98% Recyclable

A London-based company has an innovative solution for environmentally friendly, self-sufficient livingEcoFloLife designs floating residential units that are made entirely of recycled timber and aluminum. This tiny home, the WaterNest 100, was designed by the renowned Italian architect Giancarlo Zema.

The WaterNest 100 comes with rooftop solar panels and requires very minimal energy use due to its efficient heating and cooling system. Photo credit: EcoFloLife

This sleek abode is a little more than 1,000 square feet with two spacious balconies, large windows and skylights to bring in plenty of natural light. The unit can include a living room, dining area, one or two bedrooms, kitchen and bathroom or be adapted to buyers' needs. Energy is supplied by solar panels on the roof.

The WaterNest 100 requires very minimal energy use due to its efficient heating and cooling system. Additionally, 98 percent of the materials that make up this low impact dwelling are recyclable. The unit can be situated in rivers, lakes, bays, atolls and sea areas with calm waters. It doesn't have to be exclusively for housing either. It can be used for other purposes such as an office, lounge bar, restaurant or store, according to EcoFloLife.

The company's catalogue offers stylish furnishings made of recyclable materials for interior design. Photo credit: EcoFloLife

The company's catalogue offers stylish furnishings made of recyclable materials for interior design. The website offers various interior layouts for a single person, a couple, a family or as an office or other commercial space. The website explains the construction process in detail and the various materials that go into its construction, including beautiful teak floors and well insulated windows and doors.

The unit utilizes an automated "MyHome" system that allows residents to adjust lighting, air conditioning and a multi-room sound system on one screen. You're also able to monitor electricity, gas and water consumption, and at the same time, manage the temperature of each area of the house, allowing for extremely efficient energy use.

The unit utilizes an automated "MyHome" system that allows residents to adjust lighting, air conditioning and a multi-room sound system on one screen. Photo credit: EcoFloLife

If you're worried about having to get a boating license or deal with complicated construction permits, fear not, says EcoFloLife. The house, which does not have an engine, is constructed and then simply towed to its final location. Owners only need to request approval from local maritime authorities for an inland water permit and the company promises to guide you through the whole process.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Epic Urban Treehouse Offers Glimpse Into Future Living

Off Grid Living on Manhattan-Sized Island

World’s First Carbon-Positive Prefab Home Hits the Market

Sponsored
Manuta / Getty Images

By Kristi Pahr

This could be the delicious anti-inflammatory treat you've been looking for.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By John R. Platt

The world needs to change the way it eats, not just as individuals but as a society.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Rimma_Bondarenko / iStock / Getty Images

By Tiffany La Forge

We've all been there — feeling like there's just some pep missing in our step. Thankfully, there's a natural (and tasty!) solution in your pantry.

Read More Show Less
On thin ice. Christopher Michel / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

The Russian military is taking measures to protect the residents of a remote Arctic settlement from a mass of polar bears, German press agency DPA reported.

The move comes after regional authorities declared a state of emergency over the weekend after sightings of more than 50 bears in the town of Belushya Guba since December.

Read More Show Less

This year's letter from Bill and Melinda Gates focused on nine things that surprised them. For the Microsoft-cofounder, one thing he was surprised to learn was the massive amount of new buildings the planet should expect in the coming decades due to urban population growth.

"The number of buildings in the world is going to double by 2060. It's like we're going to build a new New York City every month for the next 40 years," he said.

Read More Show Less