Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Find Out Which City Just Committed to Going 100% Renewable

Business

Vancouver has pledged to derive all of its energy needs from renewable sources by 2050, after its city council passed the mayor's motion in an unanimous vote. It's the first city in Canada—and one of the few urban centers worldwide—to take this major step to away from fossil fuels.

“Cities ... need to take action," said Vancouver mayor Greg Robertson. "The world can’t wait for national governments to finish their negotiations."
Photo credit: Shutterstock

In a statement from Vancouver mayor Gregor Robertson, city staff have been directed to come up with a reasonable timeline by this fall on how to shift the city to 100 percent clean energy, which will tackle everything from transportation, buildings and even street lights. Currently, only 32 percent of Vancouver’s current energy need is met by renewable power, the motion said.

“Cities, as the most direct level of government, need to take action," Robertson said before the historic vote. "The world can’t wait for national governments to finish their negotiations. It’s time we get on the path of figuring out how to eliminate fossil fuels in as aggressive of a timeline as is realistic.”

The city plans to cut rising costs due to the impacts of climate change and the resulting extreme weather, which have cost metro Vancouver an estimated $9.5 billion, the motion said.

The motion also called for regional, provincial and national governments to advocate for a worldwide commitment to renewable energy.

“Cities around the world must show continued leadership to meet the urgent challenge of climate change, and the most impactful change we can make is a shift toward 100 percent of our energy being derived from renewable sources,” Robertson said. “The future of Vancouver’s economy and livability will depend on our ability to confront and adapt to climate change, and moving toward renewable energy is another way that Vancouver is working to become the greenest city in the world.”

In 2011, Vancouver released its award-winning Greenest City 2020 Action Plan, pledging to become the greenest city in the world by 2020. Since making the declaration, the city has made progress in decreasing total water consumption by 18 percent, decreasing landfill- or incinerator-bound solid waste by 12 percent, as well as other green measures.

Cities such as San Francisco, Sydney, Stockholm and Copenhagen have similar goals to shift to renewable energy or go fossil-free by 2050.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Clean Energy Leaders: High School Students Mobilize for Energy Efficiency in Nevada

Six Flags to Build New Jersey’s Largest Solar Farm and Become First Theme Park to Be Entirely Self-Powered

Top 10 Cities Embracing Solar Energy—Did Your City Make the List?

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

In Germany's Hunsrück village of Schorbach, numerous photovoltaic systems are installed on house roofs, on Sept. 19, 2019. Thomas Frey / Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Germany's target for renewable energy sources to deliver 65% of its consumed electricity by 2030 seemed on track Wednesday, with 52% of electricity coming from renewables in 2020's first quarter. Renewable energy advocates, however, warned the trend is imperiled by slowdowns in building new wind and solar plants.

Read More Show Less

In many parts of the U.S., family farms are disappearing and being replaced by suburban sprawl.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
General view of the empty Alma bridge, in front of the Eiffel tower, while the city imposes emergency measures to combat the Coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak, on March 17, 2020 in Paris, France. Edward Berthelot / Getty Images

Half the world is on lockdown. So, the constant hum of cars, trucks, trains and heavy machinery has stopped, drastically reducing the intensity of the vibrations rippling through the Earth's crust. Seismologists, who use highly sensitive equipment, have noticed a difference in the hum caused by human activity, according to Fast Company.

Read More Show Less
The current rate of CO2 emissions is a major event in the recorded history of Earth. EPA

By Andrew Glikson

At several points in the history of our planet, increasing amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have caused extreme global warming, prompting the majority of species on Earth to die out.

Read More Show Less
The "Earthrise" photograph that inspired the first Earth Day. NASA / Bill Anders

For EcoWatchers, April usually means one thing: Earth Day. But how do you celebrate the environment while staying home to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus?

Read More Show Less