Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Find Out if Your Eggs Are Truly Organic and Support Local Farms

Food
Find Out if Your Eggs Are Truly Organic and Support Local Farms

The Cornucopia Institute’s report, Scrambled Eggs: Separating Factory Farm Egg Production from Authentic Organic Agriculture, will empower consumers and wholesale buyers who want to invest their food dollars to protect hard-working family farmers that are in danger of being forced off the land by a landslide of eggs from factory farms.

The accompanying organic egg scorecard rates companies that market name-brand and private-label organic shell eggs based on 28 criteria that are important to organic consumers. The scorecard showcases ethical family farms and their brands and exposes factory farm producers and brands in grocery store coolers that threaten to take over organic livestock agriculture.

The scorecard also profiles some emerging brands that advertise their eggs as “pastured” although their birds are housed in fixed buildings. In contrast, the true gold standard in organic egg production is generally smaller flocks of poultry in portable henhouses which farmers rotate in fresh pasture, oftentimes daily.

Some of the factory farm operators literally raise millions of birds, both conventional and organic, with as many as 150,000 to 200,000 “organic” hens in single buildings.

With this web-based rating tool, you can see which brands of eggs found in your region are produced using the best organic farming practices and ethics. Based on more than a year’s research into the organic egg business, the scorecard rates almost 136 different name-brand eggs and additional private-label products.

Both the report and scorecard highlight the good news in the organic egg industry by showcasing the true heroes, including national and local producers that are supplying ethically-produced organic eggs and are worthy of consumer support, and those who are going beyond organic with intensively pastured birds in mobile housing.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

10 Reasons Why GMO Smart Label Isn’t ‘Smart’ at All

Congress Keeps Anti-GMO Labeling Rider Out of Spending Bill

‘Shrimp’ Made From Algae: The Latest in Fake Meat

Erin Brockovich: The Biotech Industry is Jeopardizing Our Health

The coal-fired Huaneng Power Plant in Huai 'an City, Jiangsu Province, China on Sept. 13, 2020. Costfoto / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

One of the silver linings of the coronavirus pandemic was the record drop in greenhouse gas emissions following national lockdowns. But that drop is set to all but reverse as economies begin to recover, the International Energy Agency (IEA) warned Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
A grizzly bear killed an outdoor guide in a rare attack near Yellowstone Park. William Campbell / Corbis / Getty Images

A backcountry guide has died after being mauled by a grizzly bear near Yellowstone National Park.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) re-introduces the Green New Deal in Washington, D.C. on April 20, 2021. Mandel Ngan / AFP / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

In the latest of a flurry of proposed Green New Deal legislation, Reps. Cori Bush and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Monday introduced the Green New Deal for Cities Act of 2021, a $1 trillion plan to "tackle the environmental injustices that are making us and our children sick, costing us our homes, and destroying our planet."

Read More Show Less
Offshore oil and gas drillers have left more than 18,000 miles of pipelines at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Offshore oil and gas drillers have discarded and abandoned more than 18,000 miles of pipelines on the floor of the Gulf of Mexico since the 1960s, a report from the Government Accountability Office says.

Read More Show Less
Concerns over drinking polluted water top a recent Gallup poll on environmental threats. sonsam / Getty Images

Americans are most worried about water quality compared to other environmental issues, a new Gallup survey finds.

Read More Show Less