Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Find Out How Committed Your State Is to Local Foods

Food
Find Out How Committed Your State Is to Local Foods

For the fourth year, Strolling of the Heifers, a Vermont-based local food advocacy group, has ranked the 50 states (and DC) in terms of their commitment to local foods. The winners are in for the 2015 Locavore Index: the top four are Vermont, Maine, New Hampshire and Oregon. These states also topped the list in 2014. Massachusetts moved into fifth place (from 11th in 2014). Rounding out the top 10 were Wisconsin, Montana, Hawaii, Rhode Island and Connecticut.

“The purpose of the Index is to stimulate efforts across the country to use more local food in homes, restaurants, schools and institutions,”said Orly Munzing, of Strolling of the Heifers.
Photo credit: Shutterstock

The index looks at the number of farmers' markets, the number of CSAs, the number of food hubs—all compared on a per-capita basis—and the percentage of each state's school districts with active Farm-to-School programs.This year's index includes new information from the Census of Agriculture, which "provides a direct measurement of the per-capita dollar value of food products sold directly by farms to consumers through farm stands, farmers' markets and CSAs," says Strolling of the Heifers.

The index shows that "the various policies at the national and state levels that encourage local food programs are having measurable results,” says Orly Munzing, founder and executive director of Strolling of the Heifers. “At the Federal level, there’s the Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food program which helps promote farmers markets and provides grants for farm-to-school and farm-to-institution programs. Many states also have active programs to encourage local food consumption, and Vermont’s Farm-to-Plate network is a national leader in this respect. All these programs are good for farmers, good for consumers and they help to build stronger communities.”

Find out how your state ranks:

Vermont, Maine, New Hampshire and Oregon topped the list for the second year in a row. Photo credit: Strolling of the Heifers

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Jon Stewart: Going Vegan Is the Solution to So Many of the World’s Problems

Growing Trends in the Local Food Movement Show Industry Is Thriving

Agroecology: Revolutionizing the Way We Grow Food

A sign indicates that glyphosate has been used on a farmer's field. Jo Zimny / Flickr

More than half the bacteria in the human gut microbiome are sensitive to glyphosate, the mostly commonly used herbicide in the world, reported scientists this month in the Journal of Hazardous Materials.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is seen on October 19, 2015 in Madrid, Spain. Denis Doyle / Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden announced Monday that former Secretary of State John Kerry will sit on his National Security Council (NSC) as Special Presidential Envoy for Climate.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Susanna Pershern / Submerged Resources Center/ National Park Service / public domain

By Melissa Gaskill

Two decades ago scientists and volunteers along the Virginia coast started tossing seagrass seeds into barren seaside lagoons. Disease and an intense hurricane had wiped out the plants in the 1930s, and no nearby meadows could serve as a naturally dispersing source of seeds to bring them back.

Read More Show Less
Fridays for Future climate activists demonstrate in Bonn, Germany on Sept. 25, 2020. Roberto Pfeil / picture alliance via Getty Images

Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere hit a new record in 2019 and have continued climbing this year, despite lockdowns and other measures to curb the pandemic, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said on Monday, citing preliminary data.

Read More Show Less
The Argentine black-and-white tegu is an invasive species that can reach four-feet long. Mark Newman / Getty Images

These black-and-white lizards could be the punchline of a joke, except the situation is no laughing matter.

Read More Show Less