Quantcast

Find Out How Close Your City Is to Going 100% Clean Energy

Business

Santa Monica, California announced this week that it is signing a contract to power its municipal operations with 100 percent clean energy—making it the latest in a string of cities across the U.S. striving for a goal of 100 percent clean and renewable energy. Fifteen U.S. cities so far have even gone a step further to set goals that cover all electricity use in their community—from San Diego to Aspen to Burlington, Vermont, and beyond: local leaders are seeing the “power” of choosing clean energy.

It’s not a fluke! Poll after poll shows that a majority of Americans support clean energy. Eighty-three percent of respondents to a national online survey of American adults conducted by Global Strategy Group in August 2015 supported a goal of 100 percent clean and renewable energy for the U.S. We now need to see an ambitious response to this widespread public demand in the form of action from our leaders, so that our cities, businesses, and institutions are powered by clean energy.

That’s why the Sierra Club is happy to announce the launch of our “Ready For 100” campaign, which calls for 100 percent clean energy across the U.S. With 2.4 million members and supporters, the Sierra Club will harness its massive grassroots power to lift up clean energy supporters and urge 100 cities across the U.S. to follow the lead of San Diego, Paris, Sydney, Vancouver and others that have already committed to 100 percent clean energy.

We know dirty energy is hurting our health, our water and our climate. At the same time, we see the power of clean energy. It’s not only better for our climate and environment, but it also creates jobs, boosts our economy and saves money!

We also know that it is 100 percent possible. Stanford scientists say the transition to 100 percent clean energy will save the average family more than $200 dollars per year in energy costs and another $1,500 per year in health care costs. Solar prices have fallen 80 percent in recent years and wind prices have fallen 60 percent. Clean energy is now cheaper than coal and gas in many places.

The solar industry already employs more than 200,000 people, nearly twice as many people as the coal mining industry. Solar jobs grew 12 times faster than the overall economy this year.

The American people are demanding progress for their communities, for their health, for their children and for the environment. And all Americans deserve access to good jobs, healthy communities and affordable clean energy choices. We can accelerate 100 percent clean, renewable energy while ensuring that the communities hurt worst by climate change and fossil fuel pollution benefit most from the transition, and we can fight for an economy that puts workers and families first. It’s within reach, and it’s time for action.

This moment in history—our moment—is a critical turning point. We must accelerate the transition from dirty fuels like coal and gas to clean energy sources like solar and wind to ensure climate recovery and fully realize the benefits of economic transition. Just as we switched from horses to cars, telegrams to telephones, typewriters to computers and postal mail to email, we must now commit to switch from dirty fuels to clean energy.

It will require the voices of people all across the country to declare that we are #ReadyFor100—will you join us?

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Renewable Energy Soars Amid Plummeting Fossil Fuel Prices

Denmark Just Set Yet Another World Record for Wind Power

Solar Energy Fight Heats Up in Nevada

Renewables Saw More Money Invested and More Capacity Added in 2015 Than Ever Before

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Jared Kaufman

Eating a better diet has been linked with lower levels of heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. But unfortunately 821 million people — about 1 in 9 worldwide — face hunger, and roughly 2 billion people worldwide are overweight or obese, according to the U.N. World Health Organization. In addition, food insecurity is associated with even higher health care costs in the U.S., particularly among older people. To help direct worldwide focus toward solving these issues, the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals call for the elimination of hunger, food insecurity and undernutrition by 2030.

Read More Show Less
Healthline

Made from the freshly sprouted leaves of Triticum aestivum, wheatgrass is known for its nutrient-dense and powerful antioxidant properties.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less

mevans / E+ / Getty Images

The federal agency that manages the Great Barrier Reef issued an unprecedented statement that broke ranks with Australia's conservative government and called for urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to the Guardian.

Read More Show Less

A powerful earthquake struck near Athens, Greece and shook the capital city for 15 seconds on Friday, causing people to run into the streets to escape the threat of falling buildings, NBC News reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
U.S. government scientists concluded in a new report that last month was the hottest June on record. Angelo Juan Ramos / Flickr

By Jessica Corbett

As meteorologists warned Thursday that temperatures above 100°F are expected to impact two-thirds of the country this weekend, U.S. government scientists revealed that last month was the hottest June ever recorded — bolstering calls for radical global action on the climate emergency.

Read More Show Less
Rod Waddington / CC BY-SA 2.0

By John R. Platt

For years now conservationists have warned that many of Madagascar's iconic lemur species face the risk of extinction due to rampant deforestation, the illegal pet trade and the emerging market for the primates' meat.

Yes, people eat lemurs, and the reasons they do aren't exactly what we might expect.

Read More Show Less
Pixnio

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Many types of flour are commonly available on the shelves of your local supermarket.

Read More Show Less