Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Film Exposes Harsh Reality of Living Amid North Dakota's Oil Boom

Energy
Film Exposes Harsh Reality of Living Amid North Dakota's Oil Boom

North Dakota is the fastest growing state in the U.S., but a recent video exposes why some will want to stay away from the Great Plains state.

The Dakota Resource Council’s (DRC) short film, This Is Our Country: Living with the Wild West Oil Boom, shows how North Dakota rose to become the No. 2 oil producer in the nation behind Texas and the impact that ascension has had on residents.

From housing and food prices to air quality, there seems to be few aspects of North Dakota life that oil hasn't influenced. Farmers, retirees and professors are among those who provide their impressions of the state's oil boom over the film's 30-minute course.

Theodora Bird Bear, chair of the DRC Oil & Gas Task Force, says she prefers the word "cost" as opposed to "impact" because the boom is costing current residents their quality of life and will present even greater damage to future generations.

"This is like immediate money for the state and for the local governments," Bear said. "The long-term cost, the degradation of air quality is not an issue (for oil companies) ... It's a cost somebody will be absorbing and it will not be the industry.

"It will be the children and our grandchildren."

Gasland director Josh Fox posted the DRC film on his blog this week. Each week, he posts a video that shows the harm of oil and fracking.

One of the nation's largest-ever oil spills took place in September in Tioga, ND, with more than 20,600 barrels of oil fracked from the Bakken Shale spewing from a Tesoro Logistics pipeline. A month later, an Associated Press report showed that hundreds of spills in the state went unreported in 2012 and 2013.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING pages for more related news on this topic.

A 3-hour special film by EarthxTV calls for protection of the Amazon and its indigenous populations. EarthxTV.org

To save the planet, we must save the Amazon rainforest. To save the rainforest, we must save its indigenous peoples. And to do that, we must demarcate their land.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres delivers a video speech at the high-level meeting of the 46th session of the United Nations Human Rights Council UNHRC in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 22, 2021. Xinhua / Zhang Cheng via Getty Images

By Anke Rasper

"Today's interim report from the UNFCCC is a red alert for our planet," said UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.

The report, released Friday, looks at the national climate efforts of 75 states that have already submitted their updated "nationally determined contributions," or NDCs. The countries included in the report are responsible for about 30% of the world's global greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less

Trending

New Delhi's smog is particularly thick, increasing the risk of vehicle accidents. SAJJAD HUSSAIN / AFP via Getty Images

India's New Delhi has been called the "world air pollution capital" for its high concentrations of particulate matter that make it harder for its residents to breathe and see. But one thing has puzzled scientists, according to The Guardian. Why does New Delhi see more blinding smogs than other polluted Asian cities, such as Beijing?

Read More Show Less
A bridge over the Delaware river connects New Hope, Pennsylvania with Lambertville, New Jersey. Richard T. Nowitz / Getty Images

In a historic move, the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) voted Thursday to ban hydraulic fracking in the region. The ban was supported by all four basin states — New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York — putting a permanent end to hydraulic fracking for natural gas along the 13,539-square-mile basin, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

Read More Show Less
Woodpecker

Colombia is one of the world's largest producers of coffee, and yet also one of the most economically disadvantaged. According to research by the national statistic center DANE, 35% of the population in Columbia lives in monetary poverty, compared to an estimated 11% in the U.S., according to census data. This has led to a housing insecurity issue throughout the country, one which construction company Woodpecker is working hard to solve.

Read More Show Less