Quantcast

Fighting Fracking in Brazil: Images From an Ongoing Struggle

Energy

Last December, the anti-fracking movement celebrated an important victory in Brazil. A federal judge in the city of Cruzeiro do Sul, State of Acre, ordered the suspension and cancellation of all oil and gas exploration activities, including fracking, in Juruá Valley, a region recognized as the most important stronghold of the last uncontacted indigenous peoples in the planet.

Acre is known as the "last frontier" for its lush and unspoiled nature. It’s the Brazilian state with the highest concentration of uncontacted indigenous peoples in the world. Photo credit: 350.org

The following photo series was made during a visit activists from the Não Fracking Brasil campaign made to the Juruá Valley in 2015 to share with indigenous and non-indigenous people the risks that fracking represents to their traditional way of life and the environment they rely on to thrive.

The judge’s decision concludes the Public Civil Action initiated last October against the Brazilian Federal Government, IBAMA (Brazilian Institute of Environment), ANP (National Petroleum and Gas Agency) and PETROBRAS, one of many legal battles brought about by the efforts of the Não Fracking Brasil Campaign. This ruling also clears all the projects already implemented and in operation, ensuring the preservation of the environment and security of indigenous peoples and the region's population.

The Não Fracking Brasil campaign caught the attention of Federal Attorney Thiago Pinheiro Correa, who in October submitted the public action requesting the suspension of unconventional gas exploration within the Juruá and Javari Valleys. Another bill is currently under discussion in the National Congress, calling for a five-year moratorium on fracking; it will be voted in Brazil later this year. Photo credit: 350.org

 

Last year, ANP announced the auction of gas exploration rights across extensive grounds within the Juruá Valley, encompassing protected areas such as the Serra do Divisor and overlapping with the Juruá aquifer, one of the largest in the country. Photo credit: 350.org

 

During the auction in Rio de Janeiro, indigenous leaders and activists took the microphone and spoke about climate change, indigenous rights and against fracking on their lands. Photo credit: Oriana Eliçabe / Paulo Lima / 350.org

Read page 1

Since 2013, COESUS-Coalizão Não Fracking Brasil (No Fracking Brazil Coalition), has been conducting an intense campaign, holding meetings with indigenous leaders, politicians and regional leaders, lectures, public hearings and interviews on radio and television to explain the risks of fracking. In the states of Amazonas, Paraná and Acre—where the Juruá Valley lies—the campaign is supported also by the Missionary Indigenous Council.

By far the most successful action organized by the campaign took place last October, when activists and indigenous leaders interrupted the latest auction of exploration blocks in indigenous lands in Acre and Paraná, organized by ANP (the National Petroleum Agency). Indigenous leaders gave their statements against fracking in front of representatives of major oil companies and the international press.

According to anti-fracking activist Nicole Oliveira, “The Brazilian government has been acting without transparency, auctioning off blocks and areas for unconventional gas exploration [fracking], some of them disguised as if they were intended for gas exploration by the conventional methods. The great risks this activity represents to the environment and the rural communities is not being considered.”

Activists navigated for ten hours on the Moa River through the Serra do Divisor National Park to hold meetings with Nawa, Nukini and Puyanawa communities. Photo credit: 350.org

The Não Fracking Brasil campaign aims to grow bigger and stronger in 2016. Several actions will take place throughout the year in all Brazilian states, as part of the worldwide effort the climate movement has pledged to undertake in order to stop the most dangerous fossil fuel projects and support the most ambitious climate solutions.

Along with the territory, indigenous peoples in the Juruá Valley share a history of devastation, violence and enslavement brought about by the rubber extraction enterprises in the nineteenth century. Photo credit: 350.org

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

California Farmers Irrigate Crops With Chevron’s Oil Wastewater in Drought-Stricken Central Valley

Supreme Court Deals Blow to EPA’s Clean Power Plan, Obama Vows to Fight

Gov. Brown’s Cozy Ties to Oil & Gas Is a Threat to California’s Coast and Democracy

Mark Ruffalo to David Cameron: Fracking Push Is ‘Enormous Mistake’

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Navajo Nation has suffered from limited freshwater resources as a result of climate, insufficient infrastructure, and contamination. They collaborated with NASA to develop the Drought Severity Evaluation Tool. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Native Americans are disproportionately without access to clean water, according to a new report, "Closing the Water Access Gap in the United States: A National Action Plan," to be released this afternoon, which shows that more than two million Americans do not have access to access to running water, indoor plumbing or wastewater services.

Read More Show Less
Wild Exmoor ponies graze on a meadow in the Czech Republic. rapier / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Nanticha Ocharoenchai

In the Czech Republic, horses have become the knights in shining armor. A study published in the Journal for Nature Conservation suggests that returning feral horses to grasslands in Podyjí National Park could help boost the numbers of several threatened butterfly species.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
(L) Selma Three Stone Engagement Ring. (R) The Greener Diamond Farm Project. MiaDonna

By Bailey Hopp

If you had to choose a diamond for your engagement ring from below or above the ground, which would you pick … and why would you pick it? This is the main question consumers are facing when picking out their diamond engagement ring today. With a dramatic increase in demand for conflict-free lab-grown diamonds, the diamond industry is shifting right before our eyes.

Read More Show Less

Despite huge strides in improving the lives of children since 1989, many of the world's poorest are being left behind, the United Nations children's fund UNICEF warned Monday.

Read More Show Less
At least seven people have died in a Bangladesh pipeline explosion. Youtube screenshot

At least seven people were killed when a gas pipeline exploded in Bangladesh Sunday, and another 25 were injured, the Associated Press reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
The Shell Puget Sound Refinery in Anacortes, Washington. John Westrock / Flickr

The Washington Department of Ecology responded to an oil spill that took place Friday night when a Crowley Maritime Barge was transferring five million gallons of oil to the Shell Puget Sound Refinery, CNN reported.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Claire L. Jarvis

A ruckus over biofuels has been brewing in Iowa.

Read More Show Less
Serena and Venus Williams have been known to follow a vegan diet. Edwin Martinez / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Whitney E. Akers

  • "The Game Changers" is a new documentary on Netflix that posits a vegan diet can improve athletic performance in professional athletes.

  • Limited studies available show that the type of diet — plant-based or omnivorous — doesn't give you an athletic advantage.

  • We talked to experts about what diet is the best for athletic performance.

Packed with record-setting athletes displaying cut physiques and explosive power, "The Game Changers," a new documentary on Netflix, has a clear message: Vegan is best.

Read More Show Less