Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Fighting for Air—Groups Launch Campaign to Support U.S. EPA’s Life-Saving Standards

Fighting for Air—Groups Launch Campaign to Support U.S. EPA’s Life-Saving Standards

Natural Resources Defense Council

Two national environmental protection groups have launched a six-figure online advertising campaign applauding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and President Obama for proposing life-saving standards aimed at reducing dangerous air pollution caused by auto emissions and dirty power plants.

The ads, sponsored by Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Environment America, are running on high impact local news sites and in social media outlets like Facebook in key markets in four states—Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Virginia.

“Mercury is a potent neurotoxin that damages developing brains in children and fetuses. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, coal-fired power plants are the single largest source of industrial mercury pollution and these new standards target those sources,” said Frances Beinecke, president of NRDC.

“The standards will save tens of thousands of American lives, prevent hundreds of thousands of cases of childhood asthma symptoms, and avoid tens of thousands of heart attacks, according to the EPA. These health benefits are expected to generate up to billions of dollars of savings. The magnitude of these health benefits could make this rule one of the biggest public health and environmental accomplishments of the Obama administration,” she said.

“The EPA and President Obama have taken important steps to crack down on the harmful pollution that contaminates our air and water and contributes to devastating health challenges like asthma attacks, heart attacks and even premature deaths,” said Margie Alt, executive director of Environment America. “New standards for more fuel efficient cars, proposed in November, will curb dangerous carbon emissions, reduce dangers to public health, and wean America off its oil dependence.”

The Obama administration’s proposed fuel efficiency and global warming pollution standards for new cars and light trucks in model years 2017-2025 would ensure that new cars and trucks meet the equivalent of a 54.5 miles-per-gallon fleet-wide average by 2025. They have the support of 13 major automakers and the United Auto Workers, as well as numerous environmental and consumer groups. The mercury and air toxics standard will save as many as 11,000 lives, prevent as many as 130,000 asthma attacks among children, and prevent as many as 4,700 heart attacks each year, according to the EPA.

NRDC is sponsoring the ads applauding the president for the mercury standards. The NRDC ads feature families that have volunteered to share their stories of asthma and how air pollution affects them, holding “thank you” cards addressed to the president. Environment America is sponsoring the ads asking people to show support for EPA’s auto emissions standard. Ads will be running on Wednesday, Feb. 8 on www.philly.com; www.post-gazette.com; www.cleveland.com; and www.mlive.com. On Thursday, Feb. 9, see the ads on www.philly.com and www.cleveland.com. For more about the families featured in the NRDC ads, click here.

For more information, click here.

Monarch butterflies in Mexico's Oyamel forest in Michoacan, Mexico after migrating from Canada. Luis Acosta / AFP / Getty Images

By D. André Green II

One of nature's epic events is underway: Monarch butterflies' fall migration. Departing from all across the United States and Canada, the butterflies travel up to 2,500 miles to cluster at the same locations in Mexico or along the Pacific Coast where their great-grandparents spent the previous winter.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The 30th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony on Sept. 17 introduced ten new Ig Nobel Prize winners, each intended to make people "laugh then think." Improbable Research / YouTube

The annual Ig Nobel prizes were awarded Thursday by the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research for scientific experiments that seem somewhat absurd, but are also thought-provoking. This was the 30th year the awards have been presented, but the first time they were not presented at Harvard University. Instead, they were delivered in a 75-minute pre-recorded ceremony.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Solar geoengineering would involve injecting reflective aerosols from high-altitude planes into the layer of the upper atmosphere known as the stratosphere to reduce the amount of heat trapped by greenhouse gases. namoliang / Pixabay

By Betsy Mason

For decades, climate scientist David Keith of Harvard University has been trying to get people to take his research seriously. He's a pioneer in the field of geoengineering, which aims to combat climate change through a range of technological fixes. Over the years, ideas have included sprinkling iron in the ocean to stimulate plankton to suck up more carbon from the atmosphere or capturing carbon straight out of the air.

Read More Show Less
A boy walks through plastic waste on Juhu beach in Mumbai, India on June 2, 2018. Punit Paranjpe / AFP / Getty Images

By Lisa Newcomb

Analysis released Thursday of the world's top 10 biggest plastic polluters in 15 countries reveals how major corporations hide behind the veneer of corporate responsibility while actively working to thwart regulatory legislation around the globe.

Read More Show Less
Rabbi Shmuel Herzfeld has his arm disinfected by Dr. Chao Wang during a Moderna clinical trial for a coronavirus vaccine at Meridian Clinical Research in Rockville, Maryland on July 27, 2020. Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for The Washington Post via Getty Images

The secretive blueprints for two of the leading vaccine candidates for the coronavirus were released Thursday. Pfizer and Moderna became the first two companies among the nine leading vaccine candidates to share their study designs, hoping that the disclosures will create trust and clarity for the public, as The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch