Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Feed Your Community With a $15,000 Gardens for Good Grant—Apply Now!

Food

Each year, Nature’s Path gives out three $15,000 Gardens for Good grants to deserving nonprofits devoted to feeding their communities. The urban agriculture projects that apply—and the visionary community leaders behind the garden hoses—blow us away every year with their passion for growing healthy, organic food and sharing their bounty with those who need it most.

Though each project is tailored to the needs of the community it serves, we found a common thread in their drive to build sustainable, local food systems. GroW Gardens, a George Washington University initiative that won a Gardens for Good grant in 2011, stemmed from a desire to create tangible social change in DC. They believe that urban gardens go beyond feeding the homeless, as their project mandates, to challenge the status quo by presenting a tangible alternative to the current system. For GroW Gardens, the Gardens for Good grant application spurred their community into action. As they put it, “we had the will but lacked the money. Once the two combined there was no stopping the wave that followed.”

Similarly, Oliver’s Garden Project, another 2011 grant winner, was the brainchild of six-year-old boy Oliver, who embarked on an urban gardening initiative to support at-risk youth after seeing children collecting cans to get money for food. His Hamilton, ON neighborhood is designated as a food desert, but Oliver and his admirable project are changing that—one tomato at a time. Not only does Oliver’s Garden Project grow food for the community, the Gardens for Good grant also helped them establish backyard gardens around Hamilton, enabling families in need to grow their own organic food.

We can’t help but get excited when we see the impact Gardens for Good has had in areas struggling with food security. With the support of Gardens for Good, local nonprofits are bringing organic food to their communities, and we’re seeing neighborhoods transformed by these green initiatives. By providing access to fresh, nutritious food, our previous winners address the struggles of the often-urban communities affected by poverty and lack of access to affordable food.

Do you have an organic garden vision and a solid plan to make it happen? If you’re a nonprofit with access to land, whether it’s a vacant lot or a few acres, submit your 500-word grant proposal to be eligible for one of three $15,000 Gardens for Good grants. Applications for Gardens for Good are open now until June 22, and we encourage you to put forward your plan to feed your community.

Once applications close, the voting phase begins! Get your community behind you and invite them to show support by voting between June 22 and July 6. The nine projects with the most public votes advance to the next round, and Nature’s Path will choose three projects (two in the U.S. and one in Canada) who will each receive a $15,000 cash grant as well as technical design and production mentorship from Organic Gardening magazine.

GroW Gardens has some words of wisdom for aspiring change-makers: “People need to simply go out there and try it. It’s all about the will and the attempt. We believed so strongly that we just willed the garden into existence: If you will it, it is no dream.” Gardens for Good helps you turn your urban agriculture dreams into a reality—we can’t wait to lend a hand, so apply now!

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Residents plant mangroves on the coast of West Aceh District in Indonesia on Feb. 21, 2020. Mangroves play a crucial role in stabilizing the coastline, providing protection from storms, waves and tidal erosion. Dekyon Eon / Opn Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Mangroves play a vital role in capturing carbon from the atmosphere. Mangrove forests are tremendous assets in the fight to stem the climate crisis. They store more carbon than a rainforest of the same size.

Read More Show Less
UN World Oceans Day is usually an invite-only affair at the UN headquarters in New York, but this year anyone can join in by following the live stream on the UNWOD website from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. https://unworldoceansday.org/

Monday is World Oceans Day, but how can you celebrate our blue planet while social distancing?

Read More Show Less
Cryptococcus yeasts (pictured), including ones that are hybrids, can cause life-threatening infections in primarily immunocompromised people. KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY / Getty Images

By Jacob L. Steenwyk and Antonis Rokas

From the mythical minotaur to the mule, creatures created from merging two or more distinct organisms – hybrids – have played defining roles in human history and culture. However, not all hybrids are as fantastic as the minotaur or as dependable as the mule; in fact, some of them cause human diseases.

Read More Show Less
National Trails Day 2020 is now titled In Solidarity, AHS Suspends Promotion of National Trails Day 2020. The American Hiking Society is seeking to amplify Black voices in the outdoor community and advocate for equal access to the outdoors. Klaus Vedfelt / DigitalVision / Getty Images

This Saturday, June 6, marks National Trails Day, an annual celebration of the remarkable recreational, scenic and hiking trails that crisscross parks nationwide. The event, which started in 1993, honors the National Trail System and calls for volunteers to help with trail maintenance in parks across the country.

Read More Show Less
Indigenous people from the Parque das Tribos community mourn the death of Chief Messias of the Kokama tribe from Covid-19, in Manaus, Brazil, on May 14, 2020. MICHAEL DANTAS / AFP / Getty Images

By John Letzing

This past Wednesday, when some previously hard-hit countries were able to register daily COVID-19 infections in the single digits, the Navajo Nation – a 71,000 square-kilometer (27,000-square-mile) expanse of the western US – reported 54 new cases of what's referred to locally as "Dikos Ntsaaígíí-19."

Read More Show Less
World Environment Day was put into motion almost fifty years ago by the United Nations as a response to a multitude of environmental threats. RicardoImagen / Getty Images

It's a different kind of World Environment Day this year. In prior years, it might have been enough to plant a tree, spend some extra time in the garden, or teach kids the importance of recycling. This year we have heavier tasks at hand. It's been months since we've been able to spend sufficient time outside, and as we lustfully watch the beauty of a new spring through our kitchen's glass windows, we have to decide how we'll interact with the natural world on our release, and how we can prevent, or be equipped to handle, future threats against our wellbeing.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Experts are worried that COVID-19, a primarily respiratory and airway disease, could have permanent effects on lungs, inhibiting the ability for divers to continue diving. Tiffany Duong / Ocean Rebels

Scuba divers around the world are holding their metaphorical breath to see if a coronavirus infection affects the ability to dive.

Read More Show Less