Quantcast

FDA to Ban BPA from Infant Formula

Environmental Working Group

The federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has informed Rep. Edward M. Markey (D-MA) that it is beginning a process that could end the use of the toxic plastics chemical bisphenol A, or BPA, in infant formula packaging.

“The most prevalent route of exposure to BPA for babies isn’t a baby bottle, it’s liquid infant formula,” said Sonya Lunder, a senior research analyst with Environmental Working Group (EWG). “FDA’s decision to consider removing this highly toxic hormone disruptor as a component in baby food packaging should have happened years ago. But that said, this announcement is very welcome news for millions of babies who are formula fed.”

FDA agreed to accept the petition from Markey, a senior Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, to change its regulations to prohibit the chemical’s use in infant formula packaging.

EWG researchers helped shed light on "BPA in infant formula in August of 2007 when they found that four of the world’s leading formula makers were using BPA as an ingredient in their packaging."

“If we know a way to significantly reduce a baby’s exposure to a highly toxic chemical while they’re at the most vulnerable stages of development, why on earth wouldn’t we do it?” said Lunder. “FDA, albeit belatedly, has an opportunity to get on the right side of the public’s health and correct this problem on behalf of children and parents.”

“Rep. Markey has been tireless in his efforts to protect our children from any further and unnecessary exposure to BPA,” said Jason Rano, director of government affairs for EWG. “When BPA finally comes out of infant formula, millions of parents will have the Congressman to thank for his leadership.”

The statement by Markey’s office can be found here.

Visit EcoWatch's FOOD page for more related news on this topic.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Logging state in the U.S. is seen representing some of the consequences humans will face in the absence of concrete action to stop deforestation, pollution and the climate crisis. Mark Newman / Lonely Planet Images / Getty Images

Talk is cheap, says the acting executive secretary of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity, who begged governments around the world to make sure that 2020 is not another year of conferences and empty promises, but instead is the year to take decisive action to stop the mass extinction of wildlife and the destruction of habitat-sustaining ecosystems, as The Guardian reported.

Read More
The people of Kiribati have been under pressure to relocate due to sea level rise. A young woman wades through the salty sea water that flooded her way home on Sept. 29, 2015. Jonas Gratzer / LightRocket via Getty Images

Refugees fleeing the impending effects of the climate crisis cannot be forced to return home, according to a new decision by the United Nations Human Rights Committee, as CNN reported. The new decision could open up a massive wave of legal claims by displaced people around the world.

Read More
Sponsored
The first day of the Strike WEF march on Davos on Jan. 18, 2020 near Davos, Switzerland. The activists want climate justice and think the WEF is for the world's richest and political elite only. Kristian Buus / In Pictures via Getty Images

By Ashutosh Pandey

Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg is returning to the Swiss ski resort of Davos for the 2020 World Economic Forum with a strong and clear message: put an end to the fossil fuel "madness."

Read More
Protesters attend a rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court held by the group Our Children's Trust Oct. 29, 2018 in Washington, DC. The group and the plaintiffs have vowed to keep fighting and to ask the full Ninth Circuit to review Friday's decision to toss the lawsuit. Win McNamee / Getty Images

An appeals court tossed out the landmark youth climate lawsuit Juliana v. United States Friday, arguing that the courts are not the place to resolve the climate crisis.

Read More
The land around Red Knoll near Kanab, UT that could have been razed for a frac sand mine. Tara Lohan

By Tara Lohan

A sign at the north end of Kanab, Utah, proclaims the town of 4,300 to be "The Greatest Earth on Show."

Read More