Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

FDA Bows to Industry Pressure and Delays Sunscreen Rules

Environmental Working Group

Under pressure from two cosmetic industry groups, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has decided to delay for six months implementation of pending regulations on how sunscreens are labeled and marketed.

The regulations, issued in June 2011 after more than 30 years of deliberations, will push back enforcement of the rules until mid-December 2012, allowing misleading sunscreen labels to stay on the market for another summer.

“FDA just gave consumers 1,800 more reasons to turn to our sunscreen database,” said Environmental Working Group (EWG) Senior Analyst Sonya Lunder. “We are baffled that FDA deems it necessary to delay such weak regulations. The agency has caved to industry pressure every step of the way.”

For six years, Environmental Working Group has taken upon itself to compile and publish an extensive database focused on the safety and efficacy of sunscreens on the U.S. market. The 2012 database of more than 1,800 sunscreens and SPF-rated moisturizers, lip balms and makeup products is scheduled to be released next week.

FDA announced the delay at the request of two trade groups—the Personal Care Products Council and the Consumer Healthcare Products Association—that said manufacturers needed more time to test products and revise their product labeling. The new implementation date is Dec. 17, 2012 for most companies; small companies get another year, the FDA announced Friday, May 11.

EWG estimates that 90 percent of beach and sport sunscreens on the market are already in compliance with the agency’s low-bar regulations on efficacy and safety. The new rules mainly affect product labeling, banning such claims as “sweat-proof” and “waterproof.” Additionally, products cannot claim to provide instant or all-day protection without submitting substantiating data and getting approval from FDA.

“Consumers continue to be confused by these overblown claims. They can't wait another season for these improvements to reach store shelves,” added Lunder.

For more information, click here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Food Tank

By Danielle Nierenberg and Alonso Diaz

With record high unemployment, a reeling global economy, and concerns of food shortages, the world as we know it is changing. But even as these shifts expose inequities in the health and food systems, many experts hope that the current moment offers an opportunity to build a new and more sustainable food system.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Brian J. Love and Julie Rieland

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the U.S. recycling industry. Waste sources, quantities and destinations are all in flux, and shutdowns have devastated an industry that was already struggling.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Kris Gunnars, BSc

Unhealthy foods play a primary role in many people gaining weight and developing chronic health conditions, more now than ever before.

Read More Show Less
A man pushes his mother in a wheelchair down Ocean Drive in South Beach, Miami on May 19, 2020, amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. reported more than 55,000 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, in a sign that the outbreak is not letting up as the Fourth of July weekend kicks off.

Read More Show Less
To better understand how people influence the overall health of dolphins, Oklahoma State University's Unmanned Systems Research Institute is developing a drone to collect samples from the spray that comes from their blowholes. Ken Y. / CC by 2.0

By Jason Bruck

Human actions have taken a steep toll on whales and dolphins. Some studies estimate that small whale abundance, which includes dolphins, has fallen 87% since 1980 and thousands of whales die from rope entanglement annually. But humans also cause less obvious harm. Researchers have found changes in the stress levels, reproductive health and respiratory health of these animals, but this valuable data is extremely hard to collect.

Read More Show Less

Sunscreen pollution is accelerating the demise of coral reefs globally by causing permanent DNA damage to coral. gonzalo martinez / iStock / Getty Images Plus

On July 29, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed into law a controversial bill prohibiting local governments from banning certain types of sunscreens.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Oat milk is popping up at coffee shops and grocery stores alike, quickly becoming one of the trendiest plant-based milks. jacqueline / CC by 2.0

By Kelli McGrane

Oat milk is popping up at coffee shops and grocery stores alike, quickly becoming one of the trendiest plant-based milks.

Read More Show Less