Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

FDA Approves Genetically Engineered Potato

Food
FDA Approves Genetically Engineered Potato

The new GMO potato cleared this week by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for sale in the U.S. is yet another in the long list of reasons why consumers deserve an on-package, federal mandatory labeling system, according to Just Label It.

The FDA’s decision means that the Idaho company responsible for the new GMO potato, J.R. Simplot, will be able to bring the product to market next year, assuming it gets final approval from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

“The approval of the Simplot potato is yet another reason that consumers should have a right to know what’s in their food and how it was produced,” Gary Hirshberg, chairman of Stonyfield Farm and Just Label It, said. “With the previous approval of other GMO potatoes, the Arctic apple and AquAdvantage salmon—the first GMO animal approved for human consumption—GMO foods are no longer relegated to the processed food shelves.”

Polls consistently show that nearly 90 percent of Americans, regardless of demographics and political affiliation, favor mandatory GMO labeling. Consumers in 64 other countries already have the right to know.

“Consumers should be trusted with the information to decide what food is right for their families,” Hirshberg said. “Companies should be proud of their products and support clear GMO labeling, just as Campbell Soup Company has done in announcing that it favors a national mandatory labeling system and will begin labeling its own products nationwide.”

Listen below to NPR's news report, GMO Potatoes Have Arrived. But Will Anyone Buy Them?, for more information on the GMO potato:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Outraged Republican Senator Vows to Block Appointment of FDA Commissioner Over GMO Salmon

Federal Lawsuit Filed Over North Carolina Anti-Whistleblower Law

Taiwan Bans GMOs in Schools, Mandates Strict Label Laws

Nestle, Pepsi Fined for Concealing GMOs as Campbell Soup Announces Voluntary Label

Air France airplanes parked at the Charles de Gaulle/Roissy airport on March 24, 2020. SAMSON / AFP via Getty Images

France moved one step closer this weekend to banning short-haul flights in an attempt to fight the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
A woman looks at a dead gray whale on the beach in the SF Bay area on May 23, 2019; a new spate of gray whales have been turning up dead near San Francisco. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Four gray whales have washed up dead near San Francisco within nine days, and at least one cause of death has been attributed to a ship strike.

Read More Show Less
Trending
A small tourist town has borne the brunt of a cyclone which swept across the West Australian coast. ABC News (Australia) / YouTube

Tropical Cyclone Seroja slammed into the Western Australian town of Kalbarri Sunday as a Category 3 storm before grinding a more-than 600-mile path across the country's Southwest.

Read More Show Less
A general view shows the remains of a dam along a river in Tapovan, India, on February 10, 2021, following a flash flood caused by a glacier break on February 7. Sajjad Hussain / AFP / Getty Images

By Rishika Pardikar

Search operations are still underway to find those declared missing following the Uttarakhand disaster on 7 February 2021.

Read More Show Less
Indigenous youth, organizers with the Dakota Access and Line 3 pipeline fights and climate activists march to the White House to protest against pipeline projects on April 1, 2021. Bill Clark / CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Indigenous leaders and climate campaigners on Friday blasted President Joe Biden's refusal to shut down the Dakota Access Pipeline during a court-ordered environmental review, which critics framed as a betrayal of his campaign promises to improve tribal relations and transition the country to clean energy.

Read More Show Less