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Fascinating Top 10 List from Conservation International

Conservation International

By Molly Bergen

It’s the last week of the year, and we all know what that means—it’s time for top 10 lists. From the most popular songs of the year to the most frequent Google searches, there seems to be a list for everything. And I’ll admit I get suckered into reading lots of them.

This got me wondering what a similar list would look like for Conservation International's blog. So here you go—our 10 most-viewed posts of 2012.

1. Tagging Giants: Studying Whale Sharks in Cendrawasih Bay

2. 9 Ocean Species You Never Knew You Needed

Eastern Pacific yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares). Tuna underpin the food and livelihood security of millions of people. They also act as top ocean predators that keep other species populations in check to ensure a healthy balance in the food web. (© Brian Skerry)


3. Costa Rica Leading the Way in Incentivizing Protection of Nature

Red webbed tree frog in Costa Rica. The country's thriving ecotourism industry is heavily dependent on healthy species populations. (© Piotr Naskrecki/ iLCP)


4. Adapting Coffee to a Changing Climate in Sumatra

Climate change adaptation project on a coffee farm in Central Aceh, Indonesia. (© CI/photo by Terry Hills)


5. Fishing for New Species in Suriname

Coprophanaeus lancifer—the largest dung beetle species in the Neotropics—observed by scientists working with Conservation International's Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) in Suriname in 2010. The species is not new to science. Both males and females of this species possess large head horns which they use to fight other beetles over food and mates. (© Piotr Naskrecki)


6. Conservation International Photojournal: Cambodia

Young boy fishing at sunset on Tonle Sap Lake. (© Kristin Harrison & Jeremy Ginsberg)


7. Rhino Poaching in South Africa, Up Close and Personal

A white rhino cow (at left) grazes with a bull that has become her companion after a poaching attack in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. This photo was published in the March 2012 issue of National Geographic magazine. (© Brent Stirton/National Geographic)


8. Conservation International Photojournal: The Turtle Islands
(Part 2 of 3)

A baby green sea turtle entering the ocean for the first time. (© Keith Ellenbogen)


9. Biologists Update List of World’s 25 Most Endangered Primates

A Grauer’s gorilla—one of the species listed in “Primates in Peril: The World’s 25 Most Endangered Primates, 2012-2014.” (© CI/photo by John Martin)


10. New Amphibian Captive Breeding Center Opens in Madagascar

A frog (scientific name Guibemantis pulcher) in Madagascar. In order to build their husbandry skills, technicians at the Mitsinjo captive breeding facility are starting with non-threatened frogs before moving to more rare species. (© CI/Photo by Nirhy Rabibisoa)

 

Visit EcoWatch’s BIODIVERSITY pages for more related news on this topic.

 

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