Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Farm Bill Platform Reflects Urgent Needs of Farmers and Food Entrepreneurs

National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition

On March 19, the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition released its comprehensive 2012 Farm Bill policy platform, Farming for the Future: A Sustainable Agriculture Agenda for the 2012 Food & Farm Bill.

With a round of Senate Agriculture Committee hearings complete and House Agriculture Committee field hearings underway, Congress is hard at work writing a new farm bill. Meanwhile, the perfect storm of economic, environmental and health crises currently gripping our nation demands decisive farm policy reform that will ensure a sustainable future for American agriculture. Adoption of the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition’s 2012 Farm Bill platform will expand opportunities for family farmers to produce good food, sustain the environment and contribute to vibrant communities.

“Congress should not delay the adoption of a new farm and food bill. It needs to do its job, this year, on time,” according to Susan Prolman, NSAC executive director. “The new bill, though, should be comprehensive and forward-looking, not a rush job that ignores the big issues in favor of short-term expediency.”

Farming for the Future spans nearly every title in the farm bill and reflects a comprehensive approach to farm policy reform that will:

  • Create jobs and spur economic growth through food and farms
  • Invest in the future of American agriculture
  • Enhance our natural resources and improve agricultural productivity
  • Drive innovation for tomorrow’s farmers and food entrepreneurs
  • Make healthy food widely available today and for generations to come

This platform is the culmination of two years of policy work with a broad, diverse coalition of more than 90 grassroots organizations from across the country. It reflects the real, urgent needs of farmers, ranchers and food entrepreneurs across the country.

“Slow job recovery, a rapidly aging farm population, accelerating erosion and nutrient pollution and atrophied regional food infrastructure can be viewed as a crisis or an opportunity,” said Prolman. “Done right, a new farm bill can be part of the solution, putting in place building blocks for a more sustainable future of thriving farms, healthy food and strong communities.”

The platform can be viewed online by clicking here.

For more information, click here.

—————

The National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition is a grassroots alliance that advocates for federal policy reform supporting the long-term social, economic, and environmental sustainability of agriculture, natural resources, and rural communities.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

polaristest / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner

Over six gallons of water are required to produce one gallon of wine. "Irrigation, sprays, and frost protection all [used in winemaking] require a lot of water," explained winemaker and sommelier Keith Wallace, who's also a professor and the founder of the Wine School of Philadelphia, the largest independent wine school in the U.S. And water waste is just the start of the climate-ruining inefficiencies commonplace in the wine industry. Sustainably speaking, climate change could be problematic for your favorite glass of wine.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Spinach is a true nutritional powerhouse, as it's rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Jeff Turrentine

From day to day, our public health infrastructure — the people and systems we've put in place to keep populations, as opposed to individuals, healthy — largely goes unnoticed. That's because when it's working well, its success takes the form of utter normalcy.

Read More Show Less
Spring Break vs. COVID19: The Real Impact of Ignoring Social Distancing

By Eoin Higgins

A viral video showing cell phone data collected by location accuracy company X-Mode from spring break partiers potentially spreading the coronavirus around the U.S. has brought up questions of digital privacy even as it shows convincingly the importance of staying home to defeat the disease.

Read More Show Less
Aerial shot top view Garbage trucks unload garbage to a recycle in the vicinity of the city of Bangkok, Thailand. bugto / Moment / Getty Images

German researchers have identified a strain of bacterium that not only breaks down toxic plastic, but also uses it as food to fuel the process, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less