Quantcast

Farm Aid: Beyond the Music

Food
www.youtube.com

Farm Aid's annual concert, an all-day music and food festival, will take place on Sept. 16 in Burgettstown, Pennsylvania.

Willie Nelson, Neil Young, Jack Johnson and Sheryl Crow will be headlining, among many other prominent musicians. Proceeds from the concert will benefit small family farms by providing farmers with resources and support.


Willie Nelson, Neil Young and John Mellencamp started Farm Aid as a benefit concert in 1985 to "raise awareness about the loss of family farms and to raise funds to keep farm families on the land." Since its inception in 1985, Farm Aid has flourished into a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. In 2001, Dave Matthews joined the Farm Aid board of directors.

Farm Aid has raised more than $50 million to support the family farm system in America. In addition to raising money, Farm Aid provides a hotline for farm families in crisis, 1-800-FARM-AID, and has created an online platform called the Farmer Resource Network to help farmers find important farming resources. The nonprofit has granted more than $22 million to 300 organizations across the nation, part of an effort to enhance local and regional food systems.

At this year's Farm Aid concert, food will be provided by Farm Aid's HOMEGROWN Concessions, a "first-of-its-kind model for featuring family farm-identified, local and organic foods at major concert events." Concertgoers will be able to enjoy fresh food that was locally and sustainably produced by small farmers, such as smoked salmon wraps, fresh smoothies and portobello mushroom burgers. Tickets for the 2017 Farm Aid concert are currently sold out, but there is still time to win a few VIP tickets. Click here to enter to win.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Gretchen Goldman

The Independent Particulate Matter Review Panel has released their consensus recommendations to the EPA administrator on the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Particulate Matter. The group of 20 independent experts, that were disbanded by Administrator Wheeler last October and reconvened last week, hosted by the Union of Concerned Scientists, has now made clear that the current particulate pollution standards don't protect public health and welfare.

Read More Show Less
An African elephant is pictured on November 19, 2012, in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe. MARTIN BUREAU / AFP / Getty Images

The unprecedented drought that has caused a water crisis in Zimbabwe has now claimed the life of at least 55 elephants since September, according to a wildlife spokesman, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Maria Dornelas.

By John C. Cannon

Life is reshuffling itself at an unsettling clip across Earth's surface and in its oceans, a new study has found.

Read More Show Less
An Exxon station in Florida remains open despite losing its roof during Hurricane Katrina on Aug. 29, 2005. Florida Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Shaun Withers

The country's largest fossil fuel company goes on trial today to face charges that it lied to investors about the safety of its assets in the face of the climate crisis and potential legislation to fight it, as the AP reported.

Read More Show Less
El Niño's effect on Antarctica is seen in a tabular iceberg off of Thwaites ice shelf. Jeremy Harbeck / NASA

El Niños are getting stronger due to climate change, according to a new study in Monday's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

By Julia Ries

  • Antibiotic resistance has doubled in the last 20 years.
  • Additionally a new study found one patient developed resistance to a last resort antibiotic in a matter of weeks.
  • Health experts say antibiotic prescriptions should only be given when absolutely necessary in order to avoid growing resistance.

Over the past decade, antibiotic resistance has emerged as one of the greatest public health threats.

Read More Show Less
Pexels


There are hundreds of millions of acres of public land in the U.S., but not everyone has had the chance to hike in a national forest or picnic in a state park.

Read More Show Less
Workers attend to a rooftop solar panel project on May 14, 2017 in Wuhan, China. Kevin Frayer / Getty Images

By Simon Evans

Renewable sources of electricity are set for rapid growth over the next five years, which could see them match the output of the world's coal-fired power stations for the first time ever.

Read More Show Less