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8 Cookbooks We’re Reading This Fall

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By Lindsay Campbell

From pastries to plant-based—we've got you covered.


Whole Food Cooking Every Day

Australian chef Amy Chaplin is well known for her ability to whip up a vegetarian meal with local, organic ingredients. Her latest cookbook is an unconventional take of nourishing recipes free of gluten, dairy and refined sugars. Each chapter is crafted carefully using a base recipe on everything from pastas and soups to beans and muffins. ($40, Artisan, Sept. 17, 2019)


Cook Like a Local

"Reframe your idea of what your local food is by including the food of the people who live nearby, especially the people who may not look or sound like you," writes chef and author Chris Shepherd. In six different food staple chapters, Shepherd shares his experiences exploring ethnic neighborhoods in Houston. He aims to teach readers what it takes to push past their culinary comfort-zone and cook like a local. ($35, Clarkson Potter, Sept. 3, 2019)


Butcher + Beast

Calling all carnivores—this one is for you. Angie Mar, chef and owner of New York chophouse the Beatrice Inn, shares essays on her dry-aging technique and tells the story of her iconic restaurant. In her first cookbook, Mar includes recipes for many meaty mains with flavorful dishes like milk-braised pork shoulder, buttermilk fried chicken and lavender aged beef. ($40, Clarkson Potter, Oct. 1, 2019)

Jubilee

Toni Tipton-Martin provides us with a collection of more than 125 recipes on African American cuisine. Tipton-Martin, an award-winning culinary journalist, creates recipes based on historical texts from the time of slavery and rare African American cookbooks. Her southern pecan pie laced with whiskey is an inventive take on the timeless dessert. ($35, Clarkson Potter, Nov. 5, 2019)


The Plant Paradox Family Cookbook

Dr. Steven Gundry is back with a sequel to his 2017 bestseller. The Plant Paradox Family Cookbook builds off the physician's food philosophy first told in the Plant Paradox. In this latest book, Dr. Gundry shows readers how they can make his dietary program family friendly in a crock pot or pressure cooker. ($29.99, Harper Wave, Nov. 19, 2019)

Pastry Love: A Baker’s Journal Of Favorite Recipes 

Joanne Chang's book has been dubbed the bakery bible. The award-winning pastry chef has filled pages full of recipes that would appeal to both beginners and advanced bakers. Get prepared for how-tos on making pastry cream, lemon curd and puff pastry along with treats like strawberry slab pie or passion fruit crepe cake. ($40, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Nov. 15, 2019)

The Foxfire Book of Appalachian Cookery, Revised Edition

Trace your way back to the traditional food of southern Appalachia. In this revised version of the 1984 edition, Sean Brock pens a foreword that promises recipes written as oral histories. Find unseen photographs, documentation and more accessible recipes in this modified 2019 version. There's also a new chapter on smokehouses and curing processes for those interested in processes involving salt, sugar and wood smoke. ($37.95, The University of North Carolina Press, Sept. 16, 2019)


On Flowers, Lessons from an Accidental Florist 

Not a cookbook, but an informative take on blossoms, buds and blooms. Amy Merrick shares what she learned from a collection of her adventures, like her stint on a flower farm off the coast of Washington State. Her tips and tricks consist of picking the perfect vase and how to compile a floral arrangement like a farm girl. ($35, Artisan, Oct. 15, 2019)

Reposted with permission from our media associate Modern Farmer.

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