Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Faith Against Fracking

Energy

As pressure mounts for Gov. Jerry Brown to take action on fracking and other extraction methods putting communities and the environment at risk, Californians Against Fracking released a new film Wednesday showcasing several faith leaders across a variety of faiths who are calling for a statewide moratorium and a switch to 100 percent renewable energy.

Here is an exclusive clip from the film made exclusively for EcoWatch readers:

“Although there will always be powerful voices who seeks to justify exploitative practices as a means of economic advancement, there must also be leaders who stand against this destruction and stand for life affirming economic development that will protect that which cannot be replaced,” Rev. Kelvin Sauls, Pastor of Holman United Methodist Church, said in a letter to Brown. “We ask you to rise to this moral challenge, probably the most significant of your career and one that you have long been preparing for, and declare a moratorium on fracking and other extreme methods of well stimulation and unconventional oil and gas extraction in California."

At The Church by the Side of the Road, members of Californians Against Fracking, faith leaders and community members screened the premiere of Faith Against Fracking and opened up a broad dialogue on the important role of religious groups in taking environmental action against fracking.

“This is what is unethical—the things that we’re doing for money that we know is wrong,” said Rev. Ambrose Carroll, a senior pastor at the church. “The bible says treat others as you would want to be treated. So, why would you allow something to happen on one side of town that you wouldn’t allow to happen in your own backyard? If it’s not good for you, then of course it’s not good for others.”

The documentary premiered as California is in the midst of a severe drought. Californians are being forced to cut their water usage by 25 percent, yet Brown continues to allow oil companies to use vast amounts of water for fracking and other unconventional extraction methods. Even worse, state officials have allowed oil companies to illegally inject industry waste water into hundreds of injection wells in protected aquifers. And scientific tests over the past two years found high levels of toxic chemicals in recycled waste water used to irrigate crops in the Central Valley. Meanwhile, reports of health impacts from affected communities continue to mount.

“The fight against fracking is not only about low income communities and communities of color, but communities of faith,” said Juan Flores, a former seminarian. “The reality is that if we have faith, we have to stand up for faith. We cannot let anyone come and crush us. I think what we have to take care of is quality of life. […] All of us have to come together and finally pay attention to the world that was given to us to take care of.”

Flores is Community Organizer at Center for Race, Poverty and the Environment in Delano. For three days straight, local preschool teachers in Delano were forced to stop allowing children outside on the playground when toxic fumes from an oil pump just 150 yards away made the playground unsafe.

Faith Against Fracking will be screening in churches, synagogues and religious community centers across the state in the coming months. Visit Californians Against Fracking for more information.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Fracking Chemicals Found in Drinking Water, New Study Says

Mapping the Dangers of Fracking

Jon Stewart’s Hilarious Take on Oklahoma’s Fracking Earthquakes

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

U.S. President Donald Trump listens as Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases speaks in the Rose Garden for the daily coronavirus briefing at the White House on March 29 in Washington, DC. Tasos Katopodis / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

Just over a month after proclaiming that the number of coronavirus cases in the U.S. would soon "be down to close to zero," President Donald Trump said during a press briefing on the White House lawn Sunday that limiting U.S. deaths from the pandemic to between 100,000 and 200,000 people would mean his administration and the country as a whole did "a very good job."

Read More Show Less
Dicamba is having a devastating impact in Arkansas and neighboring states. A farmer in Mississippi County, Arkansas looks at rows of soybean plants affected by dicamba. The Washington Post / Getty Images

Documents unearthed in a lawsuit brought by a Missouri farmer who claimed that Monsanto and German chemical maker BASF's dicamba herbicide ruined his peach orchard revealed that the two companies knew their new agricultural seed and chemical system would likely damage many U.S. farms, according to documents seen by The Guardian.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Washington State Governor Jay Inslee and other leaders speak to the press on March 28, 2020 in Seattle. Karen Ducey / Getty Images

Washington State has seen a slowdown in the infection rate of the novel coronavirus, for now, suggesting that early containment strategies have been effective, according to the Seattle NBC News affiliate.

Read More Show Less
A bushfire burns outside the Perth Cricket Stadium in Perth, Australia on Dec. 13, 2019. PETER PARKS / AFP via Getty Images

By Albert Van Dijk, Luigi Renzullo, Marta Yebra and Shoshana Rapley

2019 was the year Australians confronted the fact that a healthy environment is more than just a pretty waterfall in a national park; a nice extra we can do without. We do not survive without air to breathe, water to drink, soil to grow food and weather we can cope with.

Read More Show Less

By Fino Menezes

Everyone adores dolphins. Intelligent, inquisitive and playful, these special creatures have captivated humans since the dawn of time. But dolphins didn't get to where they are by accident — they needed to develop some pretty amazing superpowers to cope with their environment.

Read More Show Less