Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Exxon, Chevron Join Trump in Opposing Russia Sanctions Bill

Popular
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

ExxonMobil, Chevron and other oil bigwigs have spoken out against legislation that would establish tough, new sanctions against Russia for meddling in the 2016 election.

The U.S. oil giants worry that the bill, which overwhelmingly passed the Senate 98-2 last month, could shut down oil and gas projects around the world that involve Russian partners, according to Market Watch.


The companies have been contacting lawmakers about how the bill could "disadvantage U.S. companies compared to our non-U.S. counterparts," the Wall Street Journal reported.

"This has far-reaching impacts to a variety of companies and industries," Jack Gerard, American Petroleum Institute CEO, commented to the Journal. "It has the potential to penalize U.S. interests and advantage Russia."

The bill is currently stalled in the House but the Trump administration is reportedly lobbying House Republicans to weaken the bill as it also sets up a Congressional review process if President Trump wants to remove or ease the sanctions.

"I think our main concern overall with sanctions is how will the Congress craft them, and any potential erosion of the executive branch's authority to implement them," press secretary Sean Spicer said last week.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson expressed similar concerns.

"I would urge Congress to ensure any legislation allows the president to have the flexibility to adjust sanctions to meet the needs of what is always an evolving diplomatic situation," the former Exxon CEO said in June.

In 2012, Tillerson spearheaded a multi-billion dollar exploration and drilling deal with Russia-owned Rosneft. But the venture has largely stalled over sanctions imposed in 2014 against Russia over its annexation of Ukraine.

Tillerson has promised to recuse himself with issues related to his former company, but Exxon's opposition to the sanctions bill raises more conflict-of-interest issues swamping the Trump administration.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A sign marks the ground covering TransCanada's Keystone I pipeline outside of Steele City, Nebraska on April 21, 2012. Lucas Oleniuk / Toronto Star via Getty Images

The company behind the controversial and long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline announced it would proceed with the project Tuesday, despite concerns about the climate impacts of the pipeline and the dangers of transporting construction crews during a pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Penguins are seen near the Great Wall station in Antarctica, Feb. 9, days after the continent measured its hottest temperature on record at nearly 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Xinhua / Liu Shiping / Getty Images

By Richard Connor

Scientists have recorded Antarctica's first documented heat wave, warning that animal and plant life on the isolated continent could be drastically affected by climate change.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
The Athos I tanker was carrying crude oil from Venezuela when a collision caused oil to begin gushing into the Delaware River. U.S. Department of the Interior

A case that has bounced around the lower courts for 13 years was finally settled yesterday when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld a lower court decision, finding oil giant Citgo liable for a clean up of a 2004 oil spill in the Delaware River, according to Reuters.

Read More Show Less
The buildings of downtown Los Angeles are partially obscured in the late afternoon on Nov. 5, 2019, as seen from Pasadena, California, a day when air quality for Los Angeles was predicted to be "unhealthy for sensitive groups." Mario Tama / Getty Images

The evidence continues to build that breathing dirty air is bad for your brain.

Read More Show Less
Wave power in Portugal. The oceans' energy potential is immense. Luis Ascenso, via Wikimedia Commons

By Paul Brown

The amount of energy generated by tides and waves in the last decade has increased tenfold. Now governments around the world are planning to scale up these ventures to tap into the oceans' vast store of blue energy.

Read More Show Less