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24 Extreme Weather Events Fueled by Climate Change

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24 Extreme Weather Events Fueled by Climate Change

Global warming exacerbated two dozen extreme weather events in 2015, finds a report on extreme events and climate published by the American Meteorological Society Thursday.

American Meteorological Society

The findings, which examined 30 weather events in total, linked man-made climate change to incidents like "sunny day" flooding in Florida, Alaskan wildfires, heavy rains in China and drought in Ethiopia.

Notably, the report includes the first direct scientific link between human-caused climate change and the record high intensity of west North Pacific typhoons.

For a deeper dive:

Washington Post, AP, USA Today

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