Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Extreme Heat Grounds Flights in Arizona as Death Valley to Reach Whopping 127 Degrees

Popular
Extreme Heat Grounds Flights in Arizona as Death Valley to Reach Whopping 127 Degrees

Warnings of excessive heat in the American Southwest have forced airlines to cancel dozens of of flights this week.

American Airlines flies certain routes with the Canadian-built Bombardier CRJ aircraft, which is not permitted to fly in temperatures above 117 degrees Fahrenheit. In Phoenix, Arizona, where temperatures are around a scorching 119, American Airlines had no choice but to preemptively cancel seven flights on Monday and 43 for Tuesday.


"Our smaller regional operations—those that use our CRJ aircraft types–will be most affected by the heat," the airline's communication specialist Kent Powell told CNN. "We really aren't expecting any change to the operation with our mainline aircraft."

According to National Weather Service meteorologist Tom Fisher, temperatures in Death Valley in eastern California and in the town of Needles near the Arizona border are expected to reach a whopping 127 degrees this week.

"A strong high pressure aloft over the southwest states will create hot conditions away from the coast at least through midweek, peaking Tuesday and Wednesday," the National Weather Service reported on Monday. "High pressure may weaken slightly the latter part of the week with inland temperatures slightly lowering through Friday."

Several Northern Californian cities broke heat records on Sunday, including Sacramento (106 degrees), San Jose (103 degrees) and San Francisco (88 degrees). The high temperatures have led to power outages in California's Central Valley, the Bay Area and southern parts of the state.

Transportation officials are also looking into whether the extreme heat is behind the buckling of several freeway lanes in West Sacramento on Sunday.

A seagull flies in front of the Rampion offshore wind farm in the United Kingdom. Neil / CC BY 2.0

By Tara Lohan

A key part of the United States' clean energy transition has started to take shape, but you may need to squint to see it. About 2,000 wind turbines could be built far offshore, in federal waters off the Atlantic Coast, in the next 10 years. And more are expected.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Frank La Sorte and Kyle Horton

Millions of birds travel between their breeding and wintering grounds during spring and autumn migration, creating one of the greatest spectacles of the natural world. These journeys often span incredible distances. For example, the Blackpoll warbler, which weighs less than half an ounce, may travel up to 1,500 miles between its nesting grounds in Canada and its wintering grounds in the Caribbean and South America.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Kevin Maillefer / Unsplash

By Lynne Peeples

Editor's note: This story is part of a nine-month investigation of drinking water contamination across the U.S. The series is supported by funding from the Park Foundation and Water Foundation. Read the launch story, "Thirsting for Solutions," here.

In late September 2020, officials in Wrangell, Alaska, warned residents who were elderly, pregnant or had health problems to avoid drinking the city's tap water — unless they could filter it on their own.

Read More Show Less
Eat Just's cell-based chicken nugget is now served at Singapore restaurant 1880. Eat Just, Inc.

At a time of impending global food scarcity, cell-based meats and seafood have been heralded as the future of food.

Read More Show Less
New Zealand sea lions are an endangered species and one of the rarest species of sea lions in the world. Art Wolfe / Photodisc / Getty Images

One city in New Zealand knows what its priorities are.

Dunedin, the second largest city on New Zealand's South Island, has closed a popular road to protect a mother sea lion and her pup, The Guardian reported.

Read More Show Less