Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Extinction Rebellion Protesters Arrested in London

Climate

Six Extinction Rebellion protesters were arrested as they blocked off corporations in the UK. The group had increased their actions to week-long nationwide protests.




Hundreds of protesters obstructed the entrance to the London Concrete site beginning on Tuesday. They sported banners outside the company entrance including one saying "The air that we grieve."

London Concrete is the capital's biggest supplier of ready-mixed concrete.

In a statement, Extinction Rebellion member Eleanor McAree said "concrete has a huge environmental impact and building another tunnel will only make air pollution across East London worse."

"Air pollution is already at dangerous levels and is affecting the health of children and adults in the area," she added.

Police said they had arrested six people after they were caught trespassing and obstructing a highway.

The concrete industry is the third largest emitter of CO2 gas in the world, just behind aviation and energy production, according to the online English newspaper Carbon Brief. It produces more emissions than any country other than the U.S. or China.

British think tank Chatham House warned this month that around four billion tons of cement are produced a year. To keep to the Paris agreement, this would have to fall by at least 16% by 2030, their report said.

Summer Uprising

Tuesday marked the second day of UK wide protests, which Extinction Rebellion has dubbed the "Summer Uprising."

Hundreds of protesters blocked the London Strand on Monday with a blue yacht bearing the phrase "Act Now." Extinction Rebellion representatives have said they will continue to demonstrate until the end of the week.

"Throughout the week, rebels will disrupt central spaces in five cities with the support of local groups from across the UK," the group said. Similar protests have also taken place in Cardiff, Glasgow, Bristol and Leeds, as part of a nationwide push to fight climate change.

Protesters painted slogans including "make ecocide law" and "planet before profit" on the side of the boats, which led to traffic being diverted across the country.

Police warned on Monday that they would be prepared to "make arrests and remove obstructions as necessary."

"We have been engaged with the organizers to understand their plans, but we cannot tolerate behavior that crosses a criminal threshold or causes significant disruption to communities across the capital," it said.

Extinction Rebellion said they plan to implement a "London Tax Rebellion Declaration" on Friday. Members would withhold tax which goes towards the Greater London authority until their demands are met.

British police arrested over 1000 people in April, as Extinction Rebellion protesters blocked roads for 11 days in London. The protesters this week are demanding the release of those 1000.

Dozens of European cities have declared a climate emergency after long protests last week. Cologne became the first major German city to call an emergency.

Reposted with permission from our media associate DW.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

These seven cookbooks by Black chefs have inspired the author's family. LightFieldStudios / Getty Images

By Zahida Sherman

Cooking has always intimidated me. As a child, I would anxiously peer into the kitchen as my mother prepared Christmas dinner for our family.

Read More Show Less
Hand sanitizer is offered to students during summer school sessions at Happy Day School in Monterey Park, California on July 9, 2020. FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP via Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded its list of potentially toxic hand sanitizers to avoid because they could be contaminated with methanol.

Read More Show Less
Over the next couple of weeks, crews will fully remove the 125-foot-wide, 25-foot-tall dam, allowing the Middle Fork Nooksack to run free for the first time in 60 years. Ctyonahl / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Tara Lohan

The conclusion to decades of work to remove a dam on the Middle Fork Nooksack River east of Bellingham, Washington began with a bang yesterday as crews breached the dam with a carefully planned detonation. This explosive denouement is also a beginning.

Read More Show Less
A man observes a flooded stretch of Dock Street in Annapolis, Maryland on Jan. 25, 2010. Matt Rath / Chesapeake Bay Program

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said Tuesday that a trend of increased coastal flooding will continue to worsen as the climate crisis escalates.

Read More Show Less
A new tool called The Food Systems Dashboard aims to save decision makers time and energy by painting a complete picture of a country's food system. Photo courtesy of Dr. Jessica Fanzo and Dr. Rebecca McLaren

By Katie Howell

A new tool called The Food Systems Dashboard aims to save decision makers time and energy by painting a complete picture of a country's food system. Created by the Johns Hopkins' Alliance for a Healthier World, the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN), and the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the Dashboard compiles food systems data from over 35 sources and offers it as a public good.

Read More Show Less
White's seahorse, also called the Sydney seahorse, is native to the Pacific waters off Australia's east coast. Sylke Rohrlach / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 2.0

By Manuela Callari

It can grow to a maximum of six inches (16 centimeters), change color depending on mood and habitat, and, like all seahorses, the White's seahorse male gestates its young. But this tiny snouted fish is under threat.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Democratic Presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks at a "Build Back Better" Clean Energy event on July 14, 2020 at the Chase Center in Wilmington, Delaware. Joe Biden / Facebook

Presidential hopeful Joe Biden announced a $2 trillion plan Tuesday to boost American investment in clean energy and infrastructure.

Read More Show Less