Quantcast

Expose the Dangers of Glyphosate in Monsanto's Roundup by Supporting this Indiegogo Campaign

Health + Wellness

After directing the film Unacceptable Levels, I felt I could move past the subject of toxic chemicals and that I had pushed the subject as far as I could. I realized I was wrong after learning more about Glyphosate, the key ingredient in Roundup, a broad-spectrum weed killer developed by Monsanto.

Roundup is the number one selling herbicide worldwide, due to the increase in the planting of Monsanto’s Roundup Ready Crops, which are genetically engineered to withstand multiple applications of the weed killer during the growth cycle. Roundup is also used in residential gardens and neighborhood parks around the world.

I'm working on A New Resistance, a documentary about Glyphosate, and I need your help to raise funds via our Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign to make this film a reality. Please help me and the following supporting organizations—Moms Across America, Organic Consumers Association, Sustainable Pulse, Mamavation and GMO Free USA—raise $50,000 by Midnight, July 31.

A host of recent studies have linked Roundup and glyphosate to an alarming number of diseases threatening animal and human health, including obesity, infertility, cancer, celiac disease, gluten intolerance, irritable bowel syndrome, autism and Alzheimer’s Disease. We now know that Glyphosate is inside our bodies and enters the bodies of our newborn children through breast milk.

In July 2013, despite countless letters and documents submitted in protest, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) raised the maximum allowable residues of glyphosate in our food (most likely to accommodate the levels already routinely detected)—up to 30 times higher. Now officials are attempting to raise the allowable chemical residue of glyphosate in many important food crops, including vegetables such as carrots, sweet potatoes, flax and sunflower seeds. 

It is time to investigate glyphosate’s impact on human health and the environment. It's time to stop raising the residue limits for a chemical that has potentially harmful effects on our health. It's time to stop the use of glyphosate altogether, unless and until peer-reviewed independent studies of glyphosate prove its use to be unquestionably safe.

This film, A New Resistance, will be a learning tool, provided for free, to anyone searching the internet for information. It will be used—without restriction—by organizations, companies, bloggers and individuals to educate their communities, families, friends, co-workers and loved ones.

This documentary will serve many purposes, but it will primarily shine a light on this particular chemical and demonstrate what role the U.S. EPA and the chemical companies have played. We will follow established leaders in the field, such as neonatologist Dr. Paul Winchester, to listen, learn and understand how vital this information is for future generations.

Every penny raised from this campaign will go into the production and distribution of this film. The more money raised, the faster this film will get finished and the faster we'll educate people about this chemical. Our goal is to start shooting the film this summer and have it ready for online distribution in early 2015.

Visit our Indiegogo crowdfunding page and donate today.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Wesley Martinez Da Costa / EyeEm / Getty Images

By David R. Montgomery

Would it sound too good to be true if I was to say that there was a simple, profitable and underused agricultural method to help feed everybody, cool the planet, and revitalize rural America? I used to think so, until I started visiting farmers who are restoring fertility to their land, stashing a lot of carbon in their soil, and returning healthy profitability to family farms. Now I've come to see how restoring soil health would prove as good for farmers and rural economies as it would for the environment.

Read More Show Less
skaman306 / Moment / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

Radish (Raphanus sativus) is a cruciferous vegetable that originated in Asia and Europe (1Trusted Source).

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Tinnakorn Jorruang / iStock / Getty Images

By Dan Nosowitz

The budding research on cannabidiol, or CBD, attracts a great deal of interest in the agricultural field.

Read More Show Less
Oksana Khodakovskaia / iStock / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

The loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) is a tree native to China that's prized for its sweet, citrus-like fruit.

Read More Show Less

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) released new numbers that show vaping-related lung illnesses are continuing to grow across the country, as the number of fatalities has climbed to 33 and hospitalizations have reached 1,479 cases, according to a CDC update.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
During the summer, the Arctic tundra is usually a thriving habitat for mammals such as the Arctic fox. Education Images / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Reports of extreme snowfall in the Arctic might seem encouraging, given that the region is rapidly warming due to human-driven climate change. According to a new study, however, the snow could actually pose a major threat to the normal reproductive cycles of Arctic wildlife.

Read More Show Less
Vegan rice and garbanzo beans meals. Ella Olsson / Pexels

By Alina Petre, MS, RD (CA)

One common concern about vegan diets is whether they provide your body with all the vitamins and minerals it needs.

Many claim that a whole-food, plant-based diet easily meets all the daily nutrient requirements.

Read More Show Less
A fracking well looms over a residential area of Liberty, Colorado on Aug. 19. WildEarth Guardians / Flickr

A new multiyear study found that people living or working within 2,000 feet, or nearly half a mile, of a hydraulic fracturing (fracking) drill site may be at a heightened risk of exposure to benzene and other toxic chemicals, according to research released Thursday by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE)

Read More Show Less