Quantcast

Explore the Deep Sea With NOAA

Science

Ever wondered what the deepest part of the ocean looks like and what lives down there? We'll you're in luck. With the help of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), you'll be able to explore just that.

A deep-sea anglerfish living within the pillow basalts. This fish is an ambush predator that waits for prey to be attracted by the lure before rapidly capturing them in one gulp with its large mouths. Photo credit: NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas

NOAA is in the middle of its 2016 Deep Water Exploration of the Marianas project, aimed at exploring areas of the Pacific Ocean never seen before, according to the project's mission statement. Scientists will collect data on "bottomfish habitats, new hydrothermal vent sites, mud volcanoes, deep-sea coral and sponge communities, and seamounts, as well as subduction zone and trench areas." Data collected during this project with provide "critical information for the development of management plans for Monument areas," NOAA explains.

From May 20 to July 10, NOAA's crew will focus on exploring and mapping the northern part of the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument.

This map shows the locations of the Mariana Trench (white dashed line), Volcanic Arc (yellow dashed line), and back-arc spreading center (red line) and remnant arc (black dashed line). Photo credit: NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas

The remotely operated underwater vehicles NOAA will be guiding through these unexplored parts can reach depths of 6,000 meters (that's almost 4 miles) below the surface. That's about eight of the world's tallest building, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, stacked on top of each other.

Though most of the ocean floor is at the 6,000-meter level, the Marianas Trench can reach depths of 11,000 meters (that's almost 7 miles) below the surface.

Photo credit: Discovery News

And if all of that isn't cool enough already, you'll be able to watch it all on live stream. Viewers of the live stream will witness fish species and areas of the ocean no one has ever seen before.

This Discovery News video provides more information about the fish you might see on the live stream:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Can Virtual Reality Help Connect More People to Nature?

Rare Photos Provide Birds-Eye-View of Mount St. Helens Massive Eruption 36 Years Ago

Paddleboarder Sets Out on Epic Journey to Fight Plastic Pollution

This Man Just Completed World's First Solo Row From California to Australia

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A roller coaster on the Jersey Shore flooded after Hurricane Sandy. Photo credit: Hurricane_Sandy_New_Jersey_Pier.jpg: Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen / U.S. Air Force / New Jersey National Guard / CC BY 2.0

New Jersey will be the first state in the U.S. to require builders to take the climate crisis into consideration before seeking permission for a project.

Read More
Workers selectively harvest slightly under-ripe Syrah grapes to make a Blanc de Noir wine for the Israeli winery Zaza on Aug. 6, 2019 in central Israel. Israeli vintners are harvesting their grapes earlier than they did a decade ago due to shorter winters and more intense summers. David Silverman / Getty Images

The climate crisis may be coming for your favorite wines.

Read More
Sponsored
An aerial view of a neighborhood destroyed by the Camp Fire on Nov. 15, 2018 in Paradise, Calif. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Respecting scientists has never been a priority for the Trump Administration. Now, a new investigation from The Guardian revealed that Department of the Interior political appointees sought to play up carbon emissions from California's wildfires while hiding emissions from fossil fuels as a way to encourage more logging in the national forests controlled by the Interior department.

Read More
Slowing deforestation, planting more trees, and cutting emissions of non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gases like methane could cut another 0.5 degrees C or more off global warming by 2100. South_agency / E+ / Getty Images

By Dana Nuccitelli

Killer hurricanes, devastating wildfires, melting glaciers, and sunny-day flooding in more and more coastal areas around the world have birthed a fatalistic view cleverly dubbed by Mary Annaïse Heglar of the Natural Resources Defense Council as "de-nihilism." One manifestation: An increasing number of people appear to have grown doubtful about the possibility of staving-off climate disaster. However, a new interactive tool from a climate think tank and MIT Sloan shows that humanity could still meet the goals of the Paris agreement and limit global warming.

Read More
A baby burrowing owl perched outside its burrow on Marco Island, Florida. LagunaticPhoto / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Burrowing owls, which make their homes in small holes in the ground, are having a rough time in Florida. That's why Marco Island on the Gulf Coast passed a resolution to pay residents $250 to start an owl burrow in their front yard, as the Marco Eagle reported.

Read More