Quantcast

WATCH: EWG Asked People If They’d Like to Eat Cereal With Monsanto’s Weedkiller in It

Health + Wellness
The Cereal Bar

On a recent afternoon, across the street from the White House, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) set up an impromptu taste test and asked participants to choose between two oat-based cereals: one that likely contained a pinch of Monsanto's weedkiller linked to cancer, glyphosate, and another that did not.


Given a choice between cereals that likely contained varying levels of glyphosate, and oat-based cereal grown organically without the toxic weedkiller, the steady stream of people who took the taste test all chose the one free of Monsanto's carcinogenic herbicide.

"The response by everyone who participated in the taste test confirms what EWG has been saying for years," said EWG President Ken Cook. "Nobody wants to eat toxic pesticides with their food."

"Unfortunately, it appears executives at big food companies like General Mills and Quaker don't agree, even though it would be an easy fix to produce these cereals without glyphosate," Cook said. "The companies continue to hide behind the federal government's excessively high limits for glyphosate in food, and have not responded to multiple requests from EWG to pursue solutions," Cook added.

Two separate rounds of laboratory tests commissioned last year by EWG found glyphosate — the active ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup weedkiller — in nearly every sample of popular oat-based cereal and other oat-based food marketed to children.

The brands in which glyphosate was detected included several cereals and breakfast bars made by General Mills and Quaker.

How did this weedkiller find its way into popular breakfast cereals marketed to children? Increasingly, glyphosate is sprayed just before harvest on oats, and also on other grains, such as wheat and barley, to kill and dry out the crops so they can be picked earlier from the fields.

230,000 people have signed EWG's petition, urging Quaker and General Mills to source oats that have not been drenched with this toxic herbicide, but so far these companies have ignored the growing calls of concern.

"Consumers have spoken," added Cook. "But Quaker and General Mills clearly don't adhere to the credo that in America, the customer is always right. That's why EWG will expand our testing of these companies' products in 2019, and why we'll be taking our campaign and petition on the road to cities across the country this spring. We need to remind consumers that popular cereals commonly marketed to kids are contaminated with Monsanto's notorious, carcinogenic weedkiller."

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaking with attendees at the 2019 California Democratic Party State Convention at the George R. Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco. Gage Skidmore / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

California Gov. Gavin Newsom imposed new restrictions on oil exploration in his state yesterday by putting a moratorium on hundreds hydraulic fracturing permits until the projects are reviewed by independent scientists, as the AP reported.

Read More Show Less
The endangered Houston toad. Courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

While the planet continues to heat up, almost every single one of the 459 species listed as endangered in the U.S. will struggle as the climate crisis intensifies, according to new research published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
"This singular scientific achievement was accomplished at Heliogen's commercial facility in Lancaster, California." Heliogen

A startup backed by Bill Gates unveiled a breakthrough solar technology Tuesday that could free heavy industry from fossil fuels.

Read More Show Less
Rhodiola rosea is an adaptogenic herb that can help with chronic fatigue and stress-related burnout. Tero Laakso / Flickr

By Gavin Van De Walle, MS, RD

While everyone has specific life stressors, factors related to job pressure, money, health, and relationships tend to be the most common.

Stress can be acute or chronic and lead to fatigue, headaches, upset stomach, nervousness, and irritability or anger.

Read More Show Less
A video shows a woman rescuing a koala from Australia's wildfires. VOA News / YouTube screenshot

More than 350 koalas may have died in the wildfires raging near the Australian town of Port Macquarie in New South Wales, but one got a chance at survival after a woman risked her life to carry him to safety.

Read More Show Less