Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Every 20 Minutes an Elephant Is Killed for Its Tusks

Climate
Every 20 Minutes an Elephant Is Killed for Its Tusks

African elephants may be gone in as little as 10 years as a result of organized crime syndicates, rebel groups, militias and insurgents. That's the findings from a new program, Illicit Ivory, from the critically acclaimed series Earth Focus. The program, which will air on May 28 on Link TV, investigates this insatiable demand for ivory.

The show will "uncover the devastating effects of the illegal ivory trade, its impact on the dwindling African elephant population, and the link between this illicit activity with insurgency groups and organized crime," according to Earth Focus. Tonight at 8 p.m. ET/PT on Link TV (DirecTV channel 375 and Dish Network channel 9410) there is a sneak peek as part of its special Earth Day lineup.

The lineup will include Dr. Keeling's Curve, a one-man play by Mike Farrell (famous for his role on M*A*S*H), which chronicles the scientist whose research on atmospheric carbon dioxide levels gave the world its first early warnings of global warming. Link TV will also air the documentary Earth at Risk: Derrick Jensen, which includes the environmentalist author’s keynote address at the Earth at Risk conference in San Francisco. Also of note in the lineup are Vandana Shiva's speech at the Earth at Risk conference and Bill McKibben′s Do The Math program.

Link TV will also launch an Earth Day online hub, which will aggregate an array of online programming to highlight environmentally oriented content. To kick that off, they will air an Earth Focus episode about rhinos in South Africa’s Kruger National Park from reporter Jeff Barbee, as well as, journalist and Earth Focus correspondent Miles Benson’s blog posting, Kiss The Elephants Goodbye.

Watch the trailer for Illicit Ivory here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

13 Reasons to Be Optimistic on Earth Day

Rapper Prince Ea’s Viral Video Tells Future Generations ‘Sorry’

World’s Renowned Climate Scientists Provide Heartfelt Message About the Future of Our Planet

Icebergs float at the mouth of the Ilulissat Icefjord during a week of unseasonably warm weather on Aug. 4, 2019 near Ilulissat, Greenland. Sean Gallup /Getty Images

Rising temperatures in the air and the water surrounding Greenland are melting its massive ice sheet at a faster rate than anytime in the last 12 millennia, according to a new study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A grim new assessment of the world's flora and fungi has found that two-fifths of its species are at risk of extinction as humans encroach on the natural world, as The Guardian reported. That puts the number of species at risk near 140,000.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Flowers like bladderwort have changed their UV pigment levels in response to the climate crisis. Jean and Fred / CC BY 2.0

As human activity transforms the atmosphere, flowers are changing their colors.

Read More Show Less
A factory in Newark, N.J. emits smoke in the shadow of NYC on January 18, 2018. Kena Betancur / VIEWpress / Corbis / Getty Images

By Sharon Zhang

Back in March, when the pandemic had just planted its roots in the U.S., President Donald Trump directed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to do something devastating: The agency was to indefinitely and cruelly suspend environmental rule enforcement. The EPA complied, and for just under half a year, it provided over 3,000 waivers that granted facilities clemency from state-level environmental rule compliance.

Read More Show Less
A meteoroid skims the earth's atmosphere on Sept. 22, 2020. European Space Agency

A rare celestial event was caught on camera last week when a meteoroid "bounced" off Earth's atmosphere and veered back into space.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch