Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Every 20 Minutes an Elephant Is Killed for Its Tusks

Climate

African elephants may be gone in as little as 10 years as a result of organized crime syndicates, rebel groups, militias and insurgents. That's the findings from a new program, Illicit Ivory, from the critically acclaimed series Earth Focus. The program, which will air on May 28 on Link TV, investigates this insatiable demand for ivory.

The show will "uncover the devastating effects of the illegal ivory trade, its impact on the dwindling African elephant population, and the link between this illicit activity with insurgency groups and organized crime," according to Earth Focus. Tonight at 8 p.m. ET/PT on Link TV (DirecTV channel 375 and Dish Network channel 9410) there is a sneak peek as part of its special Earth Day lineup.

The lineup will include Dr. Keeling's Curve, a one-man play by Mike Farrell (famous for his role on M*A*S*H), which chronicles the scientist whose research on atmospheric carbon dioxide levels gave the world its first early warnings of global warming. Link TV will also air the documentary Earth at Risk: Derrick Jensen, which includes the environmentalist author’s keynote address at the Earth at Risk conference in San Francisco. Also of note in the lineup are Vandana Shiva's speech at the Earth at Risk conference and Bill McKibben′s Do The Math program.

Link TV will also launch an Earth Day online hub, which will aggregate an array of online programming to highlight environmentally oriented content. To kick that off, they will air an Earth Focus episode about rhinos in South Africa’s Kruger National Park from reporter Jeff Barbee, as well as, journalist and Earth Focus correspondent Miles Benson’s blog posting, Kiss The Elephants Goodbye.

Watch the trailer for Illicit Ivory here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

13 Reasons to Be Optimistic on Earth Day

Rapper Prince Ea’s Viral Video Tells Future Generations ‘Sorry’

World’s Renowned Climate Scientists Provide Heartfelt Message About the Future of Our Planet

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The moon sets over the border fence between the U.S. and Mexico on March 14, 2017 in Hidalgo, Texas. John Moore / Getty Images

In the midst of a global pandemic, President Donald Trump found time earlier this week to sign an executive order for U.S. companies to mine the moon's mineral resources, according to Newsweek.

Read More Show Less
Workers unload boxes of medical supplies at Mount Sinai Hospital amid the coronavirus pandemic on March 31, 2020 in New York City. Spencer Platt / Getty Images

The supply chain that provides medical supplies to the world is favoring the U.S. and Europe, which are outbidding poorer nations for masks, gowns, gloves and ventilators during the coronavirus pandemic, according to NPR.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

A garbage yard in Lucknow, India where plastic bottles are dumped before being sent to recycling. Abhimanyu Kumar Sharma / Moment / Getty Images

Scientists have engineered a mutant enzyme that converts 90 percent of plastic bottles back to pristine starting materials that can then be used to produce new high-quality bottles in just hours. The discovery could revolutionize the recycling industry, which currently saves about 30 percent of PET plastics from landfills, reported Science Magazine.

Read More Show Less
A woman drinks tea inside her home. martin-dm / Getty Images

Cabin fever is often associated with being cooped up on a rainy weekend or stuck inside during a winter blizzard.

In reality, though, it can actually occur anytime you feel isolated or disconnected from the outside world.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Pope Francis delivers his homily on April 9, 2020 behind closed doors at St. Peter's basilica in the Vatican. ALESSANDRO DI MEO / POOL / AFP via Getty Images

Pope Francis spoke about the novel coronavirus, suggesting that the global pandemic might be one of nature's responses to the man-made climate crisis.

Read More Show Less