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EVENT: Art Exhibition—Detritus

University of Cincinnati

WHAT: Artist reception and Detritus exhibition

WHEN: Reception on Feb. 16 from 5 - 7 p.m., exhibition from Feb. 13-17

WHERE: DAAP Galleries, Phillip M. Meyers, Jr. Memorial Gallery, University of Cincinnati, 2624 Clifton Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 45220

Detritus is a collaborative group installation by Low-intensity Skirmish running Feb. 13-17 at the University of Cincinnati in the Phillip M. Meyers, Jr Memorial Gallery. The collaborative group Low-intensity Skirmish is made up of artists Carrie Grubb, Cynthia Gregory, Curtis Goldstein, Tyler Hamilton, Greg Swiger, Nishant Vishwa and Jennifer Wenker.

The collaborators of this interactive show invite viewers to take part in a unique art experience that poses questions about how we construct value and meaning with materials that have been discarded. How do we as consumers and creators play a role in deciding the afterlife of detritus? Is it possible to discover meaning through the process of organization? The artists' intentions in part are to prompt each individual viewer to bring his or her own sensibilities to the organization and meaning of the recyclable and discarded objects within the gallery space. The organization of these objects, which will change throughout the exhibition, serves to present each participant with a challenge: What will the viewer physically change in the gallery space? What connections will the viewer construct? What story does the viewer wish to tell?

The artists reception will be held Feb. 16 from 5-7pm. Material support generously provided by Rumpke Recycling.

For more information, click here.

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