Quantcast

EV Drivers Want More Public Chargers, Fear Getting Stranded

Business

With an automaker incentivizing businesses with $15,000 to build charging stations and a coalition of governors plotting to reduce emissions and strengthen infrastructure, it's safe to say the adoption of electric vehicles (EV) around the U.S. is trending upward.

Sales tripled from 2011 to 2012, people are making EV-based documentaries and small businesses are developing technologies around the eco-friendly cars. The group of governors believes 215,000 zero-emission vehicles (mostly EVs) will be on American roads by 2015 and 3.3 million by 2025. Still, some in the industry think even more people would leave their gas guzzlers behind for EVs or plug-in vehicles (PEV) if they had fewer fears about their reliability, batteries and access to charging.

EV software and information services firm Recargo Inc. released its inaugural U.S. PEV Charging Study today to examine the experiences, behaviors and opinions of current PEV drivers, especially when it comes to charging. Recargo also launched its research firm PlugInsights in conjunction with the study. PlugInsights polled a panel of 3,700 PEV motorists who drive 17 different makes and models.

Graphic credit: PlugInsights

“EV drivers are sophisticated people who aren’t shy about things they want to see done differently,” said Brian Kariger, CEO of Recargo. “The list of driver suggestions that emerges from this study is long and constructive. It ranges from seemingly trivial things like wanting longer cables at public stations, to fundamental needs like a more robust charging infrastructure, broader availability of workplace charging, special utility rates, and everything in between.”

There are nearly 7,000 charging stations in the country, and harmonizing building codes to construct more is one of the main goals of the group of governors pushing for more EVs. California Gov. Jerry Brown's state announced a $6 million grant program this month to encourage the development of more charging stations at shopping centers, apartment buildings and along highways.

The study, which also refers to mid-range battery electric vehicles (BEVs), shows that drivers desperately seek a quicker way to charge batteries.

“Until fast charging becomes broadly available, [BEVs] like the Nissan LEAF are trapped on a leash, close to home,” PlugInsights Managing Director Norman Hajjar said.

Graphic credit: PlugInsights

“Our data shows the average longest trip mid-range BEV drivers have ever taken is only 93 miles," Hajjar continued. "They never stray too far from home because it’s just not practical to stop at a slow Level 2 charging station and plug in for four-plus hours, mid-journey. Until fast chargers can bridge the gap between distant points, the appeal of these vehicles to a broader audience will be limited.”

Graphic credit: PlugInsights

The study also revealed behavioral differences between plug-in electric/gas hybrid (PHEV) drivers and BEV drivers.

"They disagree on who should have priority at a public charging station," Hajjar said, "and unlike BEV drivers who must live with ‘range anxiety,’ PHEV drivers never worry getting stranded when their batteries run low.”

PlugInsights said it will reveal more thoughts from its PEV panel in additional studies in the coming months.

Visit EcoWatch’s TRANSPORTATION page for more related news on this topic.

  

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Ketura Persellin

Global consumption of beef, lamb and goat is expected to rise by almost 90 percent between 2010 and 2050. But that doesn't mean you need to eat more meat. In fact, recent news from Washington gives you even less confidence in your meat: Pork inspections may be taken over by the industry itself, if a Trump administration proposal goes into effect, putting tests for deadly pathogens into the hands of line workers.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Kaitlyn Berkheiser

While enjoying an occasional alcoholic beverage is unlikely to harm your health, drinking in excess can have substantial negative effects on your body and well-being.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
MStudioImages / E+ / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

Backpacking is an exciting way to explore the wilderness or travel to foreign countries on a budget.

Read More Show Less
Tim P. Whitby / 21st Century Fox / Getty Images

The beauty products we put on our skin can have important consequences for our health. Just this March, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned that some Claire's cosmetics had tested positive for asbestos. But the FDA could only issue a warning, not a recall, because current law does not empower the agency to do so.

Michelle Pfeiffer wants to change that.

The actress and Environmental Working Group (EWG) board member was spotted on Capitol Hill Thursday lobbying lawmakers on behalf of a bill that would increase oversight of the cosmetics industry, The Washington Post reported.

Read More Show Less
A protest march against the Line 3 pipeline in St. Paul, Minnesota on May 18, 2018. Fibonacci Blue / CC BY 2.0

By Collin Rees

We know that people power can stop dangerous fossil fuel projects like the proposed Line 3 tar sands oil pipeline in Minnesota, because we've proved it over and over again — and recently we've had two more big wins.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Scientists released a study showing that a million species are at risk for extinction, but it was largely ignored by the corporate news media. Danny Perez Photography / Flickr / CC

By Julia Conley

Scientists at the United Nations' intergovernmental body focusing on biodiversity sounded alarms earlier this month with its report on the looming potential extinction of one million species — but few heard their calls, according to a German newspaper report.

Read More Show Less
DoneGood

By Cullen Schwarz

Ethical shopping is a somewhat new phenomenon. We're far more familiar with the "tried and tested" methods of doing good, like donating our money or time.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

Summer is fast approaching, which means it's time to stock up on sunscreen to ward off the harmful effects of sun exposure. Not all sunscreens are created equally, however.

Read More Show Less