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Cancer Lawsuits Allege EPA-Monsanto Collusion

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"The Plaintiffs have a pressing need for Mr. Rowland's testimony to confirm his relationship with Monsanto and EPA's substantial role in protecting the Defendant's business..." plaintiff's attorneys wrote in the Feb. 10 filing in the multi-district litigation, which has been consolidated in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California. "Mr. Rowland operated under Monsanto's influence to cause EPA's position and publications to support Monsanto's business."

The EPA has spent the last few years assessing the health and environmental safety profile of glyphosate as global controversy over the chemical has mounted. The agency had planned to finish its risk assessment on glyphosate in 2015; then said it would be completed in 2016; then said it would be finished by the first quarter of 2017. Now the agency says it hopes to have it completed by the end of the third quarter of 2017.

Monsanto Wants Documents Kept Secret

In a bid to stop the release of further damning documents, attorneys for Monsanto on Monday asked the federal judge in the Roundup litigation to block plaintiffs' attorneys from including copies of documents they've obtained through discovery as exhibits in the court filings because members of the public and the media can see them. They argued that plaintiffs' attorneys were unfairly attempting to "try this case in the court of public opinion." Monsanto specifically complained that the organization I work for, U.S. Right to Know, was monitoring the court docket looking for confidential materials to report to the public. The company said reporting on "cherry-picked documents" could be "potentially prejudicial" to its business and to the fairness of the litigation, potentially tainting a jury pool. "Litigation in the press is not in the public interest," Monsanto's filing states.

The company asked Judge Vince Chhabria to order that discovery materials not be filed as exhibits or other types of filings that could be visible to the public.

Monsanto also made a new filing in the litigation on Friday, laying out its assertion that there is no evidence Roundup and glyphosate products are "defective or unreasonably dangerous" and said the products complied with "all applicable government safety standards." There is no evidence of carcinogenicity in glyphosate or Roundup, Monsanto said in its filing.

In a separate filing made on Feb. 8, Monsanto submitted a court brief arguing that the IARC classification of glyphosate as a probable human carcinogen is not relevant to the question of whether or not Roundup caused the plaintiffs' cancers. IARC's approach is "less rigorous" than EPA's in evaluating scientific evidence, and IARC's conclusions are "scientifically unreliable," according to the brief. Monsanto told the court that neither the views of IARC or EPA are necessarily relevant to the general causation issue of the litigation, because plaintiffs will need to present admissible expert testimony showing the company's products in fact caused their cancers.

As the litigation drags on, legislation that could potentially benefit Monsanto and numerous other companies facing consumer class action lawsuits was proposed on Feb. 9. The "Fairness in Class Action Litigation Act of 2017" (H.R. 985) was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by House Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-VA.) Business interests backing the law say it would reduce frivolous suits and ensure that plaintiffs receive the bulk of any damage awards rather than enriching the attorneys who bring such lawsuits. But opponents say it would make it nearly impossible for individuals with limited financial resources to challenge powerful corporations in court. The bill would apply both to pending and future class action and multi-district litigation.

"The bill is designed to ensure that no class action could ever be brought or litigated for anyone," said Joanne Doroshow, executive director of the Center for Justice & Democracy. "It would obliterate civil rights, antitrust, consumer, essentially every class action in America."

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