Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Environmental Champion Rep. Waxman Announces Retirement

Climate

Yesterday, Rep. Waxman (D-CA) issued a statement announcing he will not be seeking reelection in the fall. Rep. Waxman will retire at the end of the year, after serving 40 years in the U.S. House of Representatives.

“I first ran for office because I believe government can be a force for good in people’s lives," Rep. Waxman said in a written statement. "I have held this view throughout my career in Congress. And I will leave the House of Representatives with my conviction intact. I have learned that progress is not always easy. It can take years of dedication and struggle.  But it’s worth fighting for."

Rep. Waxman helped author the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments, sponsored the 1986 and 1996 Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments, successfully passed the Waxman-Markey climate bill out of the House and was instrumental in fighting back against 317 anti-environmental riders during his time in Congress. 

“Congressman Waxman has been a stalwart champion of fighting for cleaner air, water and programs that protect public health and the environment," said Trip Van Noppen, president of Earthjustice. "Not only has Waxman been a leader in speaking out against climate change, he dedicated more than two decades of his career working to pass legislation that would address the climate crisis."

“In every battle, at every juncture, in every moment that mattered most, Rep. Waxman stood up for the air we breathe, the water we drink, the lands we love and the wildlife we cherish," said Frances Beinecke, president of the Natural Resources Defense Council. “He embodies public service of the highest order, and we are all the better for his work."

Rep. Waxman was an outspoken critic of the Keystone XL pipeline, often addressing the effects increased tar sands production would have on climate change. A full summary of Rep. Waxman's accomplishments in Congress can be found here.

“In perhaps no area have the special interests held more sway than environmental policy, and I have battled them to protect clean air and safe drinking water throughout my career," Rep. Waxman continued in his written statement. 

“I have had a long career and an eventful one—and I wouldn’t trade any of it. I woke each day looking forward to opportunities to make our country stronger, healthier and fairer."

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Workers clean up a crude oil leak from a pipeline in Minnesota in 2002. JOEY MCLEISTER / Star Tribune via Getty Images

The Trump administration has finalized a rule making it harder for states and tribal communities to block pipelines and other infrastructure projects that threaten waterways.

Read More Show Less
The Pile River flows into the northern end of Lake Iliamna. The lake and its tributaries are the headwaters of the Bristol Bay region, one of the richest salmon fisheries in the world. Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wrote a letter to the Army Corps of Engineers last week to say that it would not oppose or put a stop to a huge copper and gold mine near the world's largest sockeye salmon fishery, as The Washington Post reported.

Read More Show Less
A crowd of protestors on May 31, 2020 in Washington, DC. Tasos Katopodis / Getty Images

The nationwide horror at the killing of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police has triggered protests in 75 cities. People are demonstrating against the systemic racism that has made people of color targets of lethal actions by law enforcement. In response, elected officials and public health experts are walking a fine line of affirming the rights of protestors while simultaneously worrying that the protests will lead to a new wave of coronavirus infections.

Read More Show Less
Increasing your exercise intensity is fairly simple to do. You can still participate in your favorite activities — just at a more vigorous pace. SrdjanPav / Getty Images

By Sara Lindberg

Whether you've hit a workout plateau or you're just ready to turn things up a notch, adding more strenuous exercise — also known as high-intensity exercise — to your overall fitness routine is one way to increase your calorie burn, improve your heart health, and boost your metabolism.

However, to do it safely and effectively, there are some guidelines you should follow. Keep reading to learn more about the benefits of vigorous exercise and how to safely dial up the intensity of your workouts.

Read More Show Less
As restoration managers repair damaged corals, sound recordings can help jumpstart the process of restoring vibrant – and noisy – coral reef ecosystems. CC by 2.0

A healthy coral reef is a noisy place.

Read More Show Less
While it's often dismissed as stuff for kids, a lot of grownups secretly savor it. TheCrimsonMonkey / Getty Images

By Jeffrey Miller

In January 2015, food sales at restaurants overtook those at grocery stores for the first time. Most thought this marked a permanent shift in the American meal.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A man observes the damages caused to his neighborhood from Tropical Storm Amanda on May 31, 2020 in San Salvador, El Salvador. Guillermo Martínez / APHOTOGRAFIA / Getty Images

At least 14 people were killed when Tropical Storm Amanda walloped El Salvador Sunday, Interior Minister Mario Duran said.

Read More Show Less