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ENERGY WEEK DAY TWO: Energy Reality—Overdevelopment and the Delusion of Endless Growth

Energy

Post Carbon Institute

Next month, Post Carbon Institute (PCI) and the Foundation for Deep Ecology will unveil ENERGY: Overdevelopment and the Delusion of Endless Growth, a large-format photo and essay book that will reveal the harsh realities of our pursuit of energy at any price, and the true costs, benefits and limitations of all energy options.

ENERGY features essays by more than thirty of the most brilliant minds in the fields of energy, society and ecology. ENERGY and its companion—The ENERGY Reader—lifts the veil on the harsh realities of our pursuit of energy at any price, revealing the true costs, benefits and limitations of all our energy options. Contributors include Bill McKibben, Wendell Berry, Wes Jackson, Vandana Shiva, Richard Heinberg, Lester Brown, Amory Lovins, Sandra Steingraber, James Hansen, Winona LaDuke and James Woolsey. Collectively, they offer a wake-up call about the future of energy and what each of us can do to change course.

ENERGY is the centerpiece of PCI's ENERGY REALITY CAMPAIGN, a multi-faceted effort to change the conversation around and about energy. The campaign will include "influencing the influencers," an interactive social media effort, a national "WE'RE READY" street art campaign and more.

The book ENERGY takes an unflinching look at the environmental devastation created by our thirst for energy—including supposedly “clean” renewable sources. From oil spills, nuclear accidents and mountaintop-removal coal mining to oversized wind farms and desert-destroying solar power plants, virtually every region of the globe is now experiencing the consequences of out-of-control energy development. Essentially no place is sacred, no landscape safe from the relentless search for energy resources to continue powering a culture based on perpetual growth. Precious wildlands, fragile ecosystems, even our own communities and children’s health are at risk.

Ultimately, the book offers not only a deep critique of the current system that is toxic to nature and people, but also a hopeful vision for a future energy economy in which resilience, health, beauty, biodiversity and durability, not incessant growth, are the organizing principles.

Visit EcoWatch’s ENERGY page for more related news on this topic.

 

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