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ENERGY WEEK DAY 3: Power from the People

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ENERGY WEEK DAY 3: Power from the People

Post Carbon Institute

Released just last month as the second book in our Community Resilience Guide seriesPower from the People, with a forward by Van Jones, explores how homeowners, co-ops, nonprofits, governments and businesses are putting power in the hands of local communities through distributed energy programs and energy-efficiency measures.

Author Greg Pahl explains how to plan, organize, finance and launch community-scale energy projects that harvest energy from sun, wind, water and earth. He shows that community power is a vital step on the path to energy security and community resilience—particularly as we face peak oil, cope with climate change and transition to a more sustainable future.

More than ninety percent of the electricity we use to light our communities, and nearly all the energy we use to run our cars, heat our homes and power our factories comes from large, centralized, highly polluting, nonrenewable sources of energy.

Renewable, community power is a necessary step on the path to energy security and community resilience, particularly as we face peak oil, cope with climate change and address the need to transition to a more sustainable future.

"Greg Pahl's superb guide to community energy and how to unlock its potential is essential reading for anyone interested in the economic future of the place they live. As a Community Resilience Guide it is just that—a powerful guide showing how enhancing your community's resilience is a key form of economic development. And there is nowhere better to start than with rethinking our relationship to energy," said Rob Hopkins, author of The Transition Companion. "You will find yourself waking up at 3 a.m. to scribble down the ideas and actions that this book has inspired. Make sure you keep a pen and paper by the bed."

This book—the second in the Chelsea Green Publishing Company and Post Carbon Institute’s Community Resilience Series—also profiles numerous communitywide initiatives that can be replicated and scaled broadly.

Visit EcoWatch’s ENERGY page for more related news on this topic.

 

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