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Energy East Pipeline: TransCanada's Keystone XL on Steroids

Climate

Thwarted so far in its attempts to build the Keystone XL pipeline to carry its Alberta tar sands bitumen oil south across the U.S. to the Gulf of Mexico, the TransCanada Corporation has announced that it will submit an application "within weeks" to construct its proposed, even more massive, pipeline east across the Canada continent, according to the Vancouver Observer.

The Energy East pipeline would carry tar sands oil across most of the Canadian continent and be the largest pipeline in North America. Image credit: Environmental Defence

The $12 billion Energy East pipeline would be almost 3,000 miles long compared to the slightly more than 2,000-mile Keystone XL pipeline. It would cross six provinces and skirts hundreds of communities and several major metropolitan areas including Ottawa, Quebec and Winnipeg on its way to refineries and export terminals in Quebec and New Brunswick. That would expedite the export of the tar sands oil to Europe where just this week, the European Union (EU) lifted its designation of  the oil as "dirty" opening the door for more imported Canadian oil.

While Canadian prime minister Stephen Harper has called the project "extremely exciting," environmentalists take a different view.

"Fierce opposition from environmentalists, Aboriginals, citizens and farmers have effectively stymied the Northern Gateway and Keystone XL projects," said the Vancouver Observer. "Now, Eastern Canada will soon get a taste of these oil sands dramas."

In fact it already is. Last weekend, thousands of people marched in Cacouna, Quebec, in opposition to the pipeline, reported nonprofit community social action group the Council of Canadians. Specifically, they were protesting TransCanada's plans to build a pipeline terminal of the eastern shore of the St. Lawrence River to load supertankers with tar sands oil. It would be located in a habitat essential to the endangered beluga whale. A few weeks ago, a coalition of environmental groups won a temporary injunction to stop TransCanada from doing exploratory drilling for that terminal within the beluga habitat. But that drilling will be resuming shortly.

"To protect the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River we must ban all transport of tar sands bitumen on, under and near the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River," said Council of Canadians chairperson Maude Barlow.

Although TransCanadian downplays the dangers, saying it is merely converting an old natural gas pipeline to carry tar sands bitumen, the Council of Canadians says that in itself is worrisome, with aging pipeline crossing almost 1,000 Canadian waterways.

"The pipeline would ship diluted bitumen produced in the tar sands across some of Ontario’s most important waterways," said the group. "Diluted bitumen is unlike conventional oil. The Enbridge pipeline spill in Kalamazoo, Michigan showed that diluted bitumen sinks when spilled in water, causing devastating environmental impacts that are nearly impossible to clean up. The National Energy Board has also just rubber-stamped their approval of Line 9 across southern Ontario and Quebec despite a pipeline safety expert’s testimony that there is a 90 percent chance of a catastrophic failure within a few years of the project operating."

This photo is part of an exhibit called "Exposing Energy East: People and Places at Risk By TransCanada's Energy East Pipeline Proposal," opening at Toronto's Richmond Gallery Oct. 31. Photo credit: Garth Lenz

"This mammoth pipeline would put over 125 communities, including 52 First Nations and Métis communities, at direct risk of an oil spill," said Canadian environmental group Environmental Defence. "And it would put the water and properties of millions of Canadians at risk."

The idea for the Energy East pipeline came about when U.S. environmental organizations, farmers, tribal groups and others caused President Obama to hold up approval of KXL. According to a Bloomberg article last week titled "Keystone Be Darned: Canada Finds Oil Route Around Obama," "This Canada-only idea surfaced in the days after Obama’s surprise Nov. 10, 2011, phone call informing Prime Minister Harper that Keystone was on hold."

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A volcano erupts on New Zealand's Whakaari/White Island on Dec. 9, 2019. Michael Schade / Twitter

A powerful volcano on Monday rocked an uninhabited island frequented by tourists about 30 miles off New Zealand's coast. Authorities have confirmed that five people died. They expect that number to rise as some are missing and police officials issued a statement that flights around the islands revealed "no signs of life had been seen at any point,", as The Guardian reported.

"Based on the information we have, we do not believe there are any survivors on the island," the police said in their official statement. "Police is working urgently to confirm the exact number of those who have died, further to the five confirmed deceased already."

The eruption happened on New Zealand's Whakaari/White Island, an islet jutting out of the Bay of Plenty, off the country's North Island. The island is privately owned and is typically visited for day-trips by thousands of tourists every year, according to The New York Times.

Michael Schade / Twitter

At the time of the eruption on Monday, about 50 passengers from the Ovation of Seas were on the island, including more than 30 who were part of a Royal Caribbean cruise trip, according to CNN. Twenty-three people, including the five dead, were evacuated from the island.

The eruption occurred at 2:11 pm local time on Monday, as footage from a crater camera owned and operated by GeoNet, New Zealand's geological hazards agency, shows. The camera also shows dozens of people walking near the rim as white smoke billows just before the eruption, according to Reuters.

Police were unable to reach the island because searing white ash posed imminent danger to rescue workers, said John Tims, New Zealand's deputy police commissioner, as he stood next to Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern in a press conference, as The New York Times reported. Tims said rescue workers would assess the safety of approaching the island on Tuesday morning. "We know the urgency to go back to the island," he told reporters.

"The physical environment is unsafe for us to return to the island," Tims added, as CNN reported. "It's important that we consider the health and safety of rescuers, so we're taking advice from experts going forward."

Authorities have had no communication with anyone on the island. They are frantically working to identify how many people remain and who they are, according to CNN.

Geologists said the eruption is not unexpected and some questioned why the island is open to tourism.

"The volcano has been restless for a few weeks, resulting in the raising of the alert level, so that this eruption is not really a surprise," said Bill McGuire, emeritus professor of geophysical and climate hazards at University College London, as The Guardian reported.

"White Island has been a disaster waiting to happen for many years," said Raymond Cas, emeritus professor at Monash University's school of earth, atmosphere and environment, as The Guardian reported. "Having visited it twice, I have always felt that it was too dangerous to allow the daily tour groups that visit the uninhabited island volcano by boat and helicopter."

The prime minister arrived Monday night in Whakatane, the town closest to the eruption, where day boats visiting the island are docked. Whakatane has a large Maori population.

Ardern met with local council leaders on Monday. She is scheduled to meet with search and rescue teams and will speak to the media at 7 a.m. local time (1 p.m. EST), after drones survey the island, as CNN reported.

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