Quantcast

Endangered Species Found Dead, Likely Result of Illegal Fishing

Animals

Sea Shepherd Conservation Society has vowed to increase night patrols of the Vaquita Refuge in the Gulf of California after two endangered species were found dead this weekend—a presumed result of illegal fishing activity in the area.

Sea Shepherd Conservation Society has vowed to increase night patrols of the Vaquita Refuge in the Gulf of California, after two endangered species were found dead this weekend. Photo credit: Sea Shepherd Conservation Society

While patrolling the Vaquita Refuge in the Gulf of California March 4, crew onboard Sea Shepherd Conservation Society's research vessel, the R/V Martin Sheen, found a dead vaquita porpoise floating in the water. Nearby, the crew also found a dead totoaba bass, along with a dead common dolphin. The dolphin had a hook piercing the body below the pectoral fin. In addition to finding the dead vaquita and totoaba, the crew of the M/V Farley Mowat's small boat, the Wolf, found a dead totoaba just off San Felipe March 5. The totoaba's belly was cut open and the swim bladder was removed. This swim bladder can fetch an estimated $20,000 on the illegal wildlife black markets in Asia. The vaquita and totoaba are both endangered and protected species.

Photo credit: Sea Shepherd Conservation Society

After this devastating discovery, crews then found the body of a vulnerable species: a great white shark on March 6. The shark measured approximately four meters long and was entangled in a totoaba gillnet along with a dead dolphin. The past three days of Operation Milagro demonstrate why all gillnets must be permanently banned. Gillnets are indiscriminate killers, trapping any marine life that comes into contact with them. It is presumed that all of the deaths are a result of illegal fishing activity in the refuge and Sea Shepherd will therefore increase night patrols to protect these endangered species.

In recent weeks, crews of the R/V Martin Sheen and M/V Farley Mowat have been successfully dragging specially constructed hooks to find the illegal fishing gear. Just two weeks ago, the crews were able to free a humpback whale that was entangled in a gillnet. The gillnet was set for totoaba. Totoaba are targeted by poachers for their swim bladders while vaquita are often caught and drown in the gillnets used to catch totoaba, due to their similar size. Scientists studying the vaquita estimate that there are less than 100 individuals left and that the population is declining at 18.5 percent each year.

In April, 2015, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto announced a two-year ban on the use of gillnets in a 13,000 square kilometer range of the Gulf of California. Sea Shepherd's ships the R/V Martin Sheen and M/V Farley Mowat, a former U.S. Coast Guard Cutter, have been patrolling the Vaquita Refuge since November 2015 in an effort to stop poaching of the totoaba and remove any illegal fishing gear to save the vaquita.

“Finding the dead vaquita was heartbreaking and my biggest fear became reality," commented Operation Milagro campaign leader and M/V Farley Mowat captain, Oona Layolle. “The crew of both Sea Shepherd ships have worked so hard alongside the Mexican Navy and PROFEPA to save the vaquita. With so many poachers operating at night, we will increase our night patrols to protect the vaquita."

Since Dec. 31, 2015, the Mexican government authorized Sea Shepherd to remove gillnets and other illegal fishing gear in the gillnet ban zone.

Captain Layolle continued, “This may seem like a horrible setback (and it is certainly horrible), but our efforts to save the vaquita will continue, stronger than ever. We are and will keep, doing our best so these beautiful and shy animals will not become extinct on our watch."

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Ocean 'Artivist' Creates Breathtaking Coral Reef Sculptures

Young Humpback Whale Found Dead, Exposes Devastating Impacts of Ocean Trash

TED Talk: 'It's Not Too Late for Our Oceans'

Whale Found Dead With Small Pieces of Plastic Garbage in Its Stomach

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Yulia Lisitsa / iStock / Getty Images

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Many people follow the lacto-vegetarian diet for its flexibility and health benefits.

Read More Show Less

By Jared Kaufman

Eating a better diet has been linked with lower levels of heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. But unfortunately 821 million people — about 1 in 9 worldwide — face hunger, and roughly 2 billion people worldwide are overweight or obese, according to the U.N. World Health Organization. In addition, food insecurity is associated with even higher health care costs in the U.S., particularly among older people. To help direct worldwide focus toward solving these issues, the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals call for the elimination of hunger, food insecurity and undernutrition by 2030.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
Healthline

Made from the freshly sprouted leaves of Triticum aestivum, wheatgrass is known for its nutrient-dense and powerful antioxidant properties.

Read More Show Less

mevans / E+ / Getty Images

The federal agency that manages the Great Barrier Reef issued an unprecedented statement that broke ranks with Australia's conservative government and called for urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to the Guardian.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

A powerful earthquake struck near Athens, Greece and shook the capital city for 15 seconds on Friday, causing people to run into the streets to escape the threat of falling buildings, NBC News reported.

Read More Show Less
U.S. government scientists concluded in a new report that last month was the hottest June on record. Angelo Juan Ramos / Flickr

By Jessica Corbett

As meteorologists warned Thursday that temperatures above 100°F are expected to impact two-thirds of the country this weekend, U.S. government scientists revealed that last month was the hottest June ever recorded — bolstering calls for radical global action on the climate emergency.

Read More Show Less
Rod Waddington / CC BY-SA 2.0

By John R. Platt

For years now conservationists have warned that many of Madagascar's iconic lemur species face the risk of extinction due to rampant deforestation, the illegal pet trade and the emerging market for the primates' meat.

Yes, people eat lemurs, and the reasons they do aren't exactly what we might expect.

Read More Show Less