Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Elon Musk Tells ‘60 Minutes' About How Tesla Can Change the World

Business
Elon Musk Tells ‘60 Minutes' About How Tesla Can Change the World

You probably haven't seen electric vehicles (EV) get the type of primetime exposure they received Sunday evening on network television, but if Elon Musk has his way, they'll soon become an undeniable part of our infrastructure.

Musk, the CEO of EV maker, Tesla, was the subject of a 60 Minutes feature that brought his ideology to a large-scale viewing audience that he hopes is sick of high-emissions vehicles and steep gas prices. 

Though many like show correspondent Scott Pelley believe that Musk could impact cars the way Steve Jobs changed the face of computing and phone communication, Musk revealed that he initially thought the company would fail.

"If something's important enough, you should try," he said, "even if the probably outcome is failure."

The piece also touched on SpaceX, Musk's firm that stands as the only private company to ever return a spacecraft from low-Earth orbit. He's also chairman of SolarCity, which he believes can help provide solar energy for the national network of Tesla EV chargers his company is creating.

"You can drive free, forever, on pure sunlight," he said. "Even if there's a zombie apocalypse and the grid breaks down, you'll still be able to charge your car."

The luxury EV already gets about 250 miles on a charge.

"I'm interested in things that change the world or that affect the future," Musk said.

Earlier this year, Musk spoke to CBS about the journey from New York to Los Angeles that Tesla personnel took two Model S sedans on, using only supercharger stations. This year, Consumer Reports named the Model S best overall car of the year, which certainly counts as a victory for EVs.

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

How Tesla’s Massive ‘Gigafactory’ Could Lead to 500,000 EVs Per Year

Big Win for EVs: Consumer Reports Names Tesla Model S Best Overall Car For 2014

Cross-Country Journey of Two Teslas Sets Milestone for Electric Vehicles

——–

The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York, a polluted nearly 2 mile-long waterway that is an EPA Superfund site. Jonathan Macagba / Moment / Getty Images

Thousands of Superfund sites exist around the U.S., with toxic substances left open, mismanaged and dumped. Despite the high levels of toxicity at these sites, nearly 21 million people live within a mile of one of them, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
The National Weather Service station in Chatham, Massachusetts, near the edge of a cliff at the Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge. Bryce Williams / National Weather Service in Boston / Norton

A weather research station on a bluff overlooking the sea is closing down because of the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Amsterdam is one of the Netherlands' cities which already has "milieuzones," where some types of vehicles are banned. Unsplash / jennieramida

By Douglas Broom

  • If online deliveries continue with fossil-fuel trucks, emissions will increase by a third.
  • So cities in the Netherlands will allow only emission-free delivery vehicles after 2025.
  • The government is giving delivery firms cash help to buy or lease electric vehicles.
  • The bans will save 1 megaton of CO2 every year by 2030.

Cities in the Netherlands want to make their air cleaner by banning fossil fuel delivery vehicles from urban areas from 2025.

Read More Show Less
Protestors stage a demonstration against fracking in California on May 30, 2013 in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

A bill that would have banned fracking in California died in committee Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
EXTREME-PHOTOGRAPHER / E+ / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

As world leaders prepare for this November's United Nations Climate Conference in Scotland, a new report from the Cambridge Sustainability Commission reveals that the world's wealthiest 5% were responsible for well over a third of all global emissions growth between 1990 and 2015.

Read More Show Less