Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Elon Musk Has a Secret Plan to Eliminate City Traffic With a 'New Type of Car'

Elon Musk Has a Secret Plan to Eliminate City Traffic With a 'New Type of Car'

Elon Musk's grand vision to disrupt the fossil fuel economy and accelerate sustainable transportation now might include a self-driving "bus."

At a government-sponsored talk in Norway on Thursday, the Tesla CEO hinted to transport and communications minister Ketil Solvik-Olsen that his company has a secret plan to solve traffic congestion, according to Electrek.

Solvik-Olsen: Can we expect Tesla to revolutionize mass transit when it comes to buses?

Musk: We have an idea for something which is not exactly a bus, but would solve the density problem in intercity situations. I think we need to rethink the whole concept of public transport and create something that people are actually gonna like a lot more. I don’t want to talk too much about it.

When asked if he was referring to the Hyperloop system that would transport people through high-speed vacuum tubes, Musk replied no:

Musk: There’s a new type of car or vehicle that I think would be really great (to solve vehicle density in cities problem) and actually take people to their final destination and not just to the bus stop.

As Gizmodo pointed out, it sounds like Musk and Tesla could be tackling the “first mile/last mile” dilemma, a barrier that prevents people living in suburbs or smaller cities from conveniently getting to and from transit stations. This means, for example, that you have to drive your car to the train station then drive back after you return on the train. Perhaps Musk is considering an autopiloted bus that could pick up a number of passengers enroute to the train station?

The concept is similar to UberPool or LyftLine, which are shared ride options that let you and other riders who are headed towards the same destination take a single car together. This means fewer cars on the road—and, ultimately, less CO2 emissions—if more people carpool.

Electrek observed that Musk refused to answer a question about Uber last year, prompting speculation that Tesla might be working on its own ridesharing service or they might be in talks with Uber.

Just like everyone else, Elon Musk hates sitting in traffic. He once suggested building more car tunnels to help solve congestion.

“Gridlock is just a soul-destroying thing,” he told Bloomberg last year.

Meanwhile, sales of Tesla's latest ride, the highly anticipated Model 3, have surpassed Musk's expectations.

"We are now almost at 400,000 orders for the model 3," he said at his talk in Norway, adding that interest in the model "surprised even us."

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Big Oil Gearing Up to Battle Electric Vehicles

Will Elon Musk’s Tesla Model 3 Recharge the U.S. Electric Vehicle Market?

Elon Musk Unveils Tesla Model 3: Accelerating Sustainable Transport Is ‘Important for the Future of the World’

Bloomberg: The Electric Car Revolution Is Here to Stay

Mount Ili Lewotolok spews ash during a volcanic eruption in Lembata, East Nusa Tenggara on November 29, 2020. Joy Christian / AFP / Getty Images

A large volcano in Indonesia erupted Sunday, sending a plume of smoke and ash miles into the air and forcing thousands of residents to evacuate the region.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Kaavan in Islamabad, Pakistan on Sept. 4, 2020. Arne Immanuel Bänsch / picture alliance via Getty Images

With help from music icon Cher, the "world's loneliest elephant" has found a new home and, hopefully, a new family.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Climate change is causing leaves to change color and fall earlier in the year. Pxfuel

By Philip James

As the days shorten and temperatures drop in the northern hemisphere, leaves begin to turn. We can enjoy glorious autumnal colors while the leaves are still on the trees and, later, kicking through a red, brown and gold carpet when out walking.

Read More Show Less
Kevin Russ / Moment / Getty Images

By Kang-Chun Cheng

Modoc County lies in the far northeast corner of California, and most of its 10,000 residents rely on cattle herding, logging, or government jobs for employment. Rodeos and 4-H programs fill most families' calendars; massive belt buckles, blue jeans, and cowboy hats are common attire. Modoc's niche brand of American individualism stems from a free-spirited cowboy culture that imbues the local ranching conflict with wild horses.

Read More Show Less
Christian Aslund / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Anne-Sophie Brändlin

COVID-19 and climate change have been two of the most pressing issues in 2020.

Read More Show Less