Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

GM, Ford Announce Major Electric Vehicle Plans

Popular
A concept of one of two new GM electric vehicles to be sold within 18 months. General Motors

Two of the world's largest auto companies announced major strides this week in their development of electric vehicles, marking the latest milestone in a significant shift towards EVs in the automobile industry.

On Monday, General Motors unveiled plans to roll out 20 new entirely electric car models by 2023, with two of the new EVs coming out in the next 18 months. Meanwhile, Ford announced the creation of "Team Edison," intended to accelerate the company's EV development and partnership work. The name, Quartz noted, is "seemingly in direct response to Elon Musk's Tesla, which recently surpassed Ford's market capitalization."


After the GM announcement, a Ford executive told Automotive News it was also on track to roll out 13 new EV models over the next five years. Many experts agree that a wave of new regulations worldwide, including strong commitments from the Chinese government to roll out electric vehicles, are doing more to influence the direction of U.S. automakers than consumer demand.

"General Motors believes in an all-electric future," Mark L. Reuss, G.M.'s global product chief, told the New York Times. "Although that future won't happen overnight, G.M. is committed to driving increased usage and acceptance of electric vehicles."

As reported by the New York Times:

"The automakers believe they can solve the problem of achieving—as G.M.'s chief executive, Mary T. Barra, has begun stressing—a world with "zero crashes, zero emissions, and zero congestion."

It is a stunning statement from a company that, together with Ford, sells more large pickup trucks and full-size sport utility vehicles than the rest of the global industry combined—and from an industry that grudgingly got into building electric vehicles in the face of stricter fuel emissions standards."

For a deeper dive:

Both companies: New York Times, Washington Post. GM: CNBC, USA Today, The Verge, Ars Technica, LA Times. Ford: Automotive News, Reuters, Quartz, Engadget, Forbes. China: WSJ

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Some speculate that the dissemination of the Antarctic beeches or Nothofagus moorei (seen above in Australia) dates to the time when Antarctica, Australia and South America were connected. Auscape / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

A team of scientists drilled into the ground near the South Pole to discover forest and fossils from the Cretaceous nearly 90 million years ago, which is the time when dinosaurs roamed the Earth, as the BBC reported.

Read More Show Less
The recovery of elephant seals is one of the "signs of hope" that scientists say show the oceans can recover swiftly if we let them. NOAA / CC BY 2.0

The challenges facing the world's oceans are well known: plastic pollution could crowd out fish by 2050, and the climate crisis could wipe out coral reefs by 2100.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A schoolchildren crossing sign is seen in front of burned trees in Mallacoota, Australia on Jan. 15, 2020. Luis Ascui / Getty Images

By Bhiamie Williamson, Francis Markham and Jessica Weir

The catastrophic bushfire season is officially over, but governments, agencies and communities have failed to recognize the specific and disproportionate impact the fires have had on Aboriginal peoples.

Read More Show Less
Workers convert the Scottish Events Campus, where COP26 was to be held, into a field hospital to treat COVID-19 patients. ANDY BUCHANAN / AFP via Getty Images

The most important international climate talks since the Paris agreement was reached in 2015 have been delayed because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less
An aerial view of a crude oil storage facility of Caspian Pipeline Consortium (CPC) in the Krasnodar Territory. Vitaly Timkiv / TASS / Getty Images

Oil rigs around the world keep pulling crude oil out of the ground, but the global pandemic has sent shockwaves into the market. The supply is up, but demand has plummeted now that industry has ground to a halt, highways are empty, and airplanes are parked in hangars.

Read More Show Less