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'World's Fastest Folding Electric Scooter' Revolutionizes Commuting

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The so-called "first and last mile" problem is one of the biggest hurdles with public transportation. How do you encourage more people to take Earth-friendlier commutes when their homes are miles away from the train or bus station?

One solution, as this Estonian electric scooter company proposes, is to simply take your commute with you—literally. Tallinn-based Stigo has developed a compact e-scooter that folds to the size of a rolling suitcase in about two seconds.


When folded, the Stigo L1E takes up a mere 48 × 40 cm (19 x 16 inches) of space. And at only 14 kg. (31 lbs.), it can be easily towed by hand, tucks neatly into train and bus storage compartments or, say, underneath your table at a café or the office.

"We believe Stigo will revolutionize the way people travel," Stigo CEO Ardo Reinsalu said in a statement. "Stigo is not only the world's fastest folding electric scooter, but you can also pull it along like hand luggage wherever you go, including indoors and outdoors, and charge it from a regular outlet."

According to its specs, the electric scooter has a max speed of 15 mph (25 kph) and runs on a 250W hub motor powered by a 36V lithium-Ion battery that can be charged from a regular outlet. A single charge takes about three hours and will give a range of 22 miles (40 km). You use a grip-twist throttle to adjust the speed.

"Our vision is to solve the first/last mile commuting problem by offering freedom of movement in a stylish and environmentally friendly manner," Reinsalu added.

The vehicle can be found at dealers around the world, including its first concept store in Tianjin, China. The base model sells for $1,849 at its store in the U.S.

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