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EcoWatch Next Generation

EcoWatch Next Generation works to encouraging the next generation to be good stewards of the planet by educating them about the importance of sustainability. We accomplish this by providing copies of EcoWatch Journal to school systems across the Ohio.

EcoWatch Next Generation provides school systems with a free resource that helps teachers educate students in grades 6-12 on issues relating to sustainability. This program gives teachers an opportunity to include environmental issues and awareness in their curriculum, provide information about locally-based sustainability projects impacting their region and encourage students to become environmental leaders in their school, home and community.

GOALS:

  • Encourage school systems to include the principles of sustainability in their curriculum, by using the solution-based projects promoted in EcoWatch Journal as examples.
  • Reach as many students throughout Ohio with up-to-date information about sustainability and environmental news impacting their state.
  • Create environmental leaders who will promote sustainable practices in their school, home and community, and participate in the solution-based projects promoted in EcoWatch Journal.
  • Our program is designed to help influence school systems, teachers and students to adopt sustainable lifestyles. These program include, recycling, purchasing of non-toxic cleaning products and other green school supplies, composting, purchasing of healthy local foods, and commitment and participation in their community.

 

Susanna Pershern / Submerged Resources Center/ National Park Service / public domain

By Melissa Gaskill

Two decades ago scientists and volunteers along the Virginia coast started tossing seagrass seeds into barren seaside lagoons. Disease and an intense hurricane had wiped out the plants in the 1930s, and no nearby meadows could serve as a naturally dispersing source of seeds to bring them back.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Fridays for Future climate activists demonstrate in Bonn, Germany on Sept. 25, 2020. Roberto Pfeil / picture alliance via Getty Images

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