Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Inspiring Student in France Creates Environmental App to Motivate Others to Make a Difference Daily

Facebook Videos
Inspiring Student in France Creates Environmental App to Motivate Others to Make a Difference Daily
EcoWatch interviewed Maxime Leroux Thursday.on EcoWatch Live. EcoWatch Live Screenshot

Maxime Leroux, a 19-year-old student in France is creating an online community of people executing one "save" per day for the sake of the planet.


OneSave/Day is the name of the free app that is empowering thousands to commit to just one daily action to be a better environmental steward.

"What an inspiration he is," commented Misty Hay, an "EcoWatcher" who tuned in to an EcoWatch Live interview with Leroux on Thursday. "It's bringing you one action every single day that you can do," said Leroux.

Prior to the launch of this app, Leroux had never touched app development. He hadn't even considered himself to be an environmentalist. "I had no real relationship to this topic," he said.

Leroux was a typical college student who grew up with a "normal" life. He began to absorb headlines about the climate crisis which leave many with a growing sense of eco-anxiety. He shared more about these sentiments on the blog Eco Warrior Princess:

I was frustrated that there seemed nothing I could do every single day to make a difference; to me, taking daily action just seemed to matter.

My thoughts were that [I] alone would not have a crucial impact, but as a community, we could make all the individual actions count. Imagine 100,000 persons picking up one piece of trash on the same day. The result would be amazing, it would only take seconds for each participant to complete and the actions can easily be done every day.

EcoWatch, BBC and CNN Climate are some of many sources Leroux began to study to figure out the biggest problems our planet faces. Once he began examining the problems, he started to find the solutions.

Plastic pollution is the most obvious example. "What can we do about this problem?" he asked. "Where do we consume plastic? Why do we have plastic?" Once he figured out some of the sources of the problem, one place being grocery stores, he began to create simple "saves" that anyone can do such as: Take the minimum amount of plastic from the grocery stores. On the day of the interview the task was to find out about local car sharing options.

Since the app is in its early stages of evolution, there is much room for improvement and some bugs are currently being worked out. Leroux invites EcoWatchers to find the app on instagram by searching One Save a Day and to send any feedback or ideas for future saves.

A byproduct of doing one save per day is a feeling of satisfaction at the end of each day. He receives feedback from individuals saying, "At the end of the day I know that I've done something good on this day for the planet."

Leroux wrapped up the EcoWatch Live interview by encouraging viewers to avoid comparing themselves to others such as those thriving in the zero-waste lifestyle and to try instead one "save" a day.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Mountain Valley Pipeline proposes to carry natural gas for hundreds of miles over dozens of water sources, through protected areas and crossing the Appalachian Trail. Appalachian Trail Conservancy / YouTube

It's been a bad summer for fracked natural gas pipelines in North Carolina.

Read More Show Less
Atlantic puffins courting at Maine Coastal Island National Wildlife Refuge in 2009. USFWS / Flickr

When Europeans first arrived in North America, Atlantic puffins were common on islands in the Gulf of Maine. But hunters killed many of the birds for food or for feathers to adorn ladies' hats. By the 1800s, the population in Maine had plummeted.

Read More Show Less
Rescue workers dig through the rubble following a gas explosion in Baltimore, Maryland on Aug. 10, 2020. J. Countess / Getty Images

A "major" natural gas explosion killed two people and seriously injured at least seven in Baltimore, Maryland Monday morning.

Read More Show Less
The recalled list includes red, yellow, white and sweet yellow onions, which may be tainted with salmonella. Pxhere

Nearly 900 people across the U.S. and Canada have been sickened by salmonella linked to onions distributed by Thomson International, the The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less
Methane flares at a fracking site near a home in Colorado on Oct. 25, 2014. WildEarth Guardians / Flickr

In the coming days, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is expected to use its power to roll back yet another Obama-era environmental protection meant to curb air pollution and slow the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Researchers on the ICESCAPE mission, funded by NASA, examine melt ponds and their surrounding ice in 2011 to see how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the biological and chemical makeup of the ocean. NASA / Flickr

By Alex Kirby

The temperature of the Arctic matters to the entire world: it helps to keep the global climate fairly cool. Scientists now say that by 2035 there could be an end to Arctic sea ice.

Read More Show Less

Trending

President Vladimir Putin is seen enjoying the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images

Russia's Health Ministry has given regulatory approval for the world's first COVID-19 vaccine after less than two months of human testing, President Vladimir Putin said on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less