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EcoWatch Joins Growing Number of Certified B Corporations

Business

EcoWatch is proud to announce its standing as a Certified B Corporation.

Wayne, PA-based nonprofit B Lab has certified more than 800 companies worldwide that voluntarily embrace social and environmental responsibility in their day-to-day decisions. Each firm must pass an assessment, meet a tough set of standards and apply for recertification every two years. EcoWatch scored a 91 on its B Impact report. Companies are eligible for certification if they score 80 or higher.

"Business leaders have a new freedom to make decisions that are in the best interests of society as well as their bottom line," B Lab co-founder Jay Coen Gilbert said. "We are delighted to have companies like EcoWatch band together to turn the tide and leverage the power of business to solve social and environmental problems."

B Corp status enables companies to work together in support of legislation and partner with like-minded entities while achieving things all businesses desire—attracting investors, garnering press and differentiating themselves from competitors.

"The value of meeting the legal requirement for B Corp certification is that it bakes sustainability into the DNA of your company as it grows," according to the B Corp website.

Notable B Corps include NutivaBen & Jerry's, Patagonia and Seventh Generation. In all, there are 850 B Corps in 27 countries and 60 industries worldwide. On July 17, Delaware became the 19th state (plus D.C.) to enact benefit corporation legislation.

"Media plays a vital role in educating people on the most critical issues of our time," said EcoWatch board member Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. "EcoWatch is leading the charge in using online news to drive fundamental change and unite all shades of green to ensure the health and longevity of our planet."

EcoWatch is at the forefront of cutting-edge news that educates and motivates readers to engage in protecting human health and the environment. EcoWatch founder and CEO Stefanie Spear is confident that B Corp certification will greatly enhance EcoWatch's ability to fulfill its mission.

"We are moving ahead on all fronts to bring people together to transform green," Spear said. "We want to strategically align ourselves with companies that prioritize social and environmental equity. Becoming a Certified B Corporation was a natural move for us."

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