Quantcast
Sponsored

Copy of Job Openings at EcoWatch

EcoWatch is one of the nation's leading environmental news sites engaging millions of readers every month. We are at the forefront of uniting all shades of green to ensure the health and longevity of our planet. EcoWatch is leading the charge in using online news to drive fundamental change.

Job Openings

Freelance Reporter

• 3+ years experience as an online news reporter

• Superior editing and writing skills

• Advanced knowledge of content management systems

• Compose 1 to 2 original news posts a day

• Ability to pitch relevant and trending news from credible sources

• Availability in early morning hours, eastern standard time

• Write articles that engage readers and encourage them to share content

• Write engaging and clickable headlines and craft content to go viral

• Expertise with image editing software

• Utilize best practices for SEO

• Must have an acute attention to detail

• Work efficiently during deadline situations

• Exhibit enthusiasm, flexibility and a positive attitude

To apply, email cover letter, resume and three references to jobs@ecowatch.com with the subject line APPLY FREELANCE REPORTER.


If you are interested in an internship, please email bautista@ecowatch.com.

Show Comments ()
Renewable Energy
Solar panel installations and a wind turbine at the Phu Lac wind farm in southern Vietnam's Binh Thuan province on April 23, 2019. MANAN VATSYAYANA / AFP via Getty Images

Renewable Sources Made up 72% of New Energy Added in 2019

Renewable energy made up almost three quarters of all new energy capacity added in 2019, data released Monday by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) shows.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
The buildings of downtown Los Angeles are partially obscured at midday on November 5, 2019 as seen from Pasadena, California. Mario Tama / Getty Images.

Coronavirus: Air Pollution Might Raise Risk of Fatality

By Ajit Niranjan

Two main risk factors are currently known to raise the chance of dying from the novel coronavirus that has brought the world to a halt: being old and having a weak immune system.

Air pollution makes the second of those more likely.

Keep reading... Show less
Insights + Opinion
Hospital workers applaud during a tribute to the essential health care workers at Hospital Universitario de Mostoles in Mostoles, Spain on March 27, 2020. Legan P. Mace / SOPA Images / LightRocket via Getty Images

Express Gratitude – Not Because You'll Benefit From It, but Others Might

By Jennifer Cheavens and David Cregg

The world is currently in the midst of a pandemic where the most useful thing many of us can do is stay at home and keep away from others. Schools, restaurants, office buildings and movie theaters are closed. Many people are feeling disoriented, disconnected and scared.

Keep reading... Show less
Insights + Opinion
Essential farm workers continue to work as Florida agriculture industry struggles during coronavirus pandemic. Joe Raedle / Getty Images.

We Need a Green New Deal for Farmland

By Liz Carlisle

This opinion piece was originally published by Yes! Magazine on March 30, 2020.

As the coronavirus crisis has laid bare, the U.S. urgently needs a strategic plan for farmland. The very lands we need to ensure community food security and resilience in the face of crises like this pandemic and climate change are currently being paved over, planted to chemically raised feed grains for factory farm animals, and acquired by institutional investors and speculators. For far too long, the fate of farmlands has flown under the radar of public dialogue—but a powerful new proposal from think tank Data for Progress lays out how a national strategic plan for farmland could help boost economic recovery while putting the U.S. on a path to carbon neutrality.

Keep reading... Show less
Health + Wellness
A worker with nonprofit organization Martha's Table loads bags of fresh produce to distribute to people in need during the novel coronavirus outbreak on April 1, 2020 in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Here’s How to Clean Your Groceries During the COVID-19 Outbreak

By Shawn Radcliffe

The CDC recommends that all people wear cloth face masks in public places where it's difficult to maintain a 6-foot distance from others. This will help slow the spread of the virus from people without symptoms or people who do not know they have contracted the virus. Cloth face masks should be worn while continuing to practice social distancing. Instructions for making masks at home can be found here. Note: It's critical to reserve surgical masks and N95 respirators for healthcare workers.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
Coral bleaching in the Great Barrier Reef in 2016. Oregon State University / CC BY-SA 2.0

2020 Great Barrier Reef Bleaching Event Is Most Widespread to Date

The Great Barrier Reef's third mass bleaching event in five years is also its most widespread, according to new data released Tuesday.

Keep reading... Show less
Health + Wellness
The CDC has emphasized that washing hands with soap and water is one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Guido Mieth / Moment / Getty Images

Millions of Americans Face Water Shutoffs During Pandemic

The Centers for Disease Control has emphasized that washing hands with soap and water is one of the most effective measures we can take in preventing the spread of COVID-19. However, millions of Americans in some of the most vulnerable communities face the prospect of having their water shut off during the lockdowns, according to The Guardian.

Keep reading... Show less
Animals
A California newt (Taricha torosa) from Napa County, California, USA. Connor Long / CC BY-SA 3.0

Will Climate Change Push These Amphibians to the Brink?

By Tara Lohan

Aerial photos of the Sierra Nevada — the long mountain range stretching down the spine of California — showed rust-colored swathes following the state's record-breaking five-year drought that ended in 2016. The 100 million dead trees were one of the most visible examples of the ecological toll the drought had wrought.

Now, a few years later, we're starting to learn about how smaller, less noticeable species were affected.

Keep reading... Show less