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Copy of Job Openings at EcoWatch

EcoWatch is one of the nation's leading environmental news sites engaging millions of readers every month. We are at the forefront of uniting all shades of green to ensure the health and longevity of our planet. EcoWatch is leading the charge in using online news to drive fundamental change.

Job Openings

Freelance Reporter

• 3+ years experience as an online news reporter

• Superior editing and writing skills

• Advanced knowledge of content management systems

• Compose 1 to 2 original news posts a day

• Ability to pitch relevant and trending news from credible sources

• Availability in early morning hours, eastern standard time

• Write articles that engage readers and encourage them to share content

• Write engaging and clickable headlines and craft content to go viral

• Expertise with image editing software

• Utilize best practices for SEO

• Must have an acute attention to detail

• Work efficiently during deadline situations

• Exhibit enthusiasm, flexibility and a positive attitude

To apply, email cover letter, resume and three references to [email protected] with the subject line APPLY FREELANCE REPORTER.


If you are interested in an internship, please email [email protected].

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