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Economic and Job Growth Starts with Policy

Energy
Economic and Job Growth Starts with Policy

Pew Environment Group

In lieu of federal action, states are adopting energy policies that create jobs and attract private investment. These activities are as varied as the states themselves, but they all have common goals—spurring economic and job growth while improving energy security and the environment. Businesses that operate within the clean energy economy are speaking out for America’s need for national clean energy policy, underscoring Pew’s research, which demonstrates that policy does matter. On this interactive map you can click on states to see which of four common policies each state has already implemented and learn what businesses in that state are saying.

Globally, the clean energy economy is growing rapidly but the growth has not been even across nations. Pew’s research shows that nations with clear, consistent and ambitious clean energy policies attract greater private investment. As the U.S. persists without a domestic energy plan, we continue to see declines in clean energy investment and our ranking in the clean energy race.

Still, there is immense opportunity. With the global clean power market having the potential to reach $2.3 trillion by 2020, a strong competitive position is vital for the U.S. to capture a significant portion of that revenue. However, without national energy policy providing market certainty, the U.S. risks missing out on a significant economic opportunity.

Learn more with our interactive map by clicking here.

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