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7 Non-Toxic Yoga Mats

Business

By Lauren Bowen

So many of the products that we buy and use daily will end up in a landfill at the end of their lives—especially those made from plastics or other unrecyclable (or uncompostable) materials.

Yoga mats usually fall into this category.


Fortunately, more and more incredible companies are producing sustainable, chemical-free yoga mats. Most are made from jute or all-natural rubber—materials that are gentle on the Earth, without sacrificing grip quality.

Sound like something you'd be into? Read on.

1. Manduka eKO Lite Mat

Thick and extra-cushioned for joint support (but weighing less than five pounds) this high-quality mat may very well change your life. It's made from biodegradable, non-Amazon-harvested, natural tree rubber which means no toxic PVC, no plasticizers and no foaming agents! Trust me, it's worth the investment.

2. Yoloha Nomad Cork Yoga Mat

If you're tired of your yoga mat getting slippery when wet, you've just found your holy grail. This 4 millimeter yoga mat is constructed from anti-microbial, premium-grade cork that is both self-cleaning and biodegradable! Bonus: Any cork material leftover during the mat's no-waste manufacturing process is reused to make new products. Pretty cool, huh?

3. Affirmats Yoga Mat

This eco-friendly, non-toxic yoga mat is a real treat! Each mat is decorated with a positive affirmation like "I am enough" or "I am free" to inspire you during your practice. Made from slip-resistent jute and eco-PVC, this 5 millimeter mat is completely free of nasty phthalates, latex and heavy metals. It even gets more slip-resistant with use!

4. Barefoot Yoga Original Eco Yoga Mat

The Original Eco Yoga Mat is eco-conscious and non-toxic. Composed exclusively from all-natural rubber and jute fiber, you can rest assured that it is free of chemical additives. Highly durable, flexible and natural-feeling, you'll never go back to your old mat.

5. Jade Harmony Yoga Mat

This Jade Yoga mat is a favorite among yogis. It contains zero PVC, EVA or other synthetic rubber and is made instead from sustainable, renewable rubber. Designed in a number of sizes and widths, odds are you've just found the perfect tailor made option. Bonus: For every mat sold, Jade plants a tree!

6. Dragonfly TPE Lite Mat

The TPE Lite Mat is a beautiful take on minimalism in yoga gear. Look closely and you'll discover that the entire surface is imprinted with tiny dragonflies! This mat is made using closed-cell technology to prevent any sweat and other nasties from penetrating its surface. So, rest assured: your mat will stay germ-free.

7. PrAna Henna ECO Yoga Mat

This top selling yoga mat is made from non-toxic TPE that is both chemical-free and UV-resistant. Plus, it has a gorgeous henna print on the top side. This product also has a closed-cell construction so you don't need to worry about anything nasty absorbing into the mat.

You spend a lot of time on your yoga mat! So invest in one that has a long lifespan and won't expose you to nasty chemicals. Which mat is your favorite?

Reposted with permission from our media associate Care2.

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