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Nearly 100 Dead After Powerful Earthquake Strikes Indonesia

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Nearly 100 Dead After Powerful Earthquake Strikes Indonesia
Damaged houses are seen in Pemenang, North Lombok on Aug. 6, the day after a 6.9 magnitude earthquake struck the area. ADEK BERRY / AFP / Getty Images

At least 98 people have died and another were 200 seriously injured after a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck the Indonesian resort island of Lombok Sunday evening.

Nearly 20,000 people were displaced by the powerful temblor and housed in temporary shelters, the New York Times reported on Monday, citing Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, a spokesman for Indonesia's National Disaster Management Board.


Footage on social media shows structures shaking and panicked people fleeing towards safety. About 2,700 mostly foreign visitors have also been evacuated to nearby islands, the Guardian reported.

Victims are being treated at makeshift wards set up in tents.

"Many injured people are being treated outside of hospitals and health clinics because the buildings were damaged," Nugroho told AFP.

Indonesian authorities measured the quake at a magnitude of 7.0. The U.S. Geological Survey, which measured it as a 6.9, said it happened as the result of shallow thrust fault on or near The Flores Back Arc Thrust.

The deadly quake, which occurred off the north coast of Lombok and felt in neighboring Bali and parts of East Java, comes not long after a magnitude 6.4 quake hit Lombok on July 29, killing 16 people and damaged hundreds of buildings. A tsunami warning was issued but later cancelled.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo expressed his condolences to the earthquake victims.

"To the people of Lombok and surrounding areas, please keep calm," he tweeted Monday. "Our brothers are not alone in facing this ordeal. We are with you all."

He also said in a press conference that he has ordered the Ministry for Political, Legal and Security Affairs to coordinate rescue and recovery efforts on Lombok "so that the handling of this earthquake crisis can be done as fast as possible.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who recently left Jakarta after an official visit, offered "deepest sympathies" to all affected by the earthquake.

"We are closely monitoring the aftermath," he added.

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