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EarthEcho Launches My Ocean Campaign

EarthEcho Launches My Ocean Campaign

EarthEcho International

by Phillippe Cousteau

I'm writing to announce EarthEcho’s new partnership with the Ian Somerhalder Foundation and Tout. We call it the My Ocean campaign. The campaign asks young people 13 to 22 to make their voices count this summer by joining Ian (the star of "Vampire Diaries") and I in making a statement about what they are doing to protect the oceans. The campaign is part of the educational outreach surrounding the USA Pavilion at the 2012 International Expo in Yeosu, Korea and runs from now to July 13.

Contestants are eligible to win one of these amazing prizes:
• Grand Prize: Two round-trip tickets to Yeosu, Korea, to see the USA Pavilion at the 2012 World Expo
• Second Place: A video of Ian Somerhalder and I thanking them for their commitment to the oceans that can be posted on a Facebook page or personal website
• Third Place: A boxed DVD set of a complete season of "The Vampire Diaries" signed by Ian Somerhalder
 
There are two things that would really help this campaign:
• Spread the word. Share and like this post to help us find young people to tell their stories.
• Submit your own Tout. While you might be too old to participate in the contest (I emphasize the MIGHT in that sentence), we would love to hear the many things that each of you are doing to protect the oceans. In 15 seconds you can create a video that will get out to thousands of people, spreading your message across a wide network. A Tout is a 15 second video, a lot like Twitter only in a video format.

With your help, we hope to inspire young people across the country to make choices that protect the oceans.
 
To learn more about the My Ocean campaign and to submit your own Tout click here.

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Explorer, social entrepreneur and environmental advocate, Philippe Cousteau is the 31-year-old son of Jan and Philippe Cousteau Sr., and the grandson of Captain Jacques-Yves Cousteau. As a member of the legendary family, Philippe is continuing the work of his father through EarthEcho International, the non-profit organization he founded with his sister and mother and of which he serves as President.

Visit EcoWatch’s WATER page for more related news on this topic.

 

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