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Take Heart! Here’s How You Can Show the Love for the Earth This Valentine’s Day

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Take Heart! Here’s How You Can Show the Love for the Earth This Valentine’s Day

For the third year running, Climate Reality is teaming up with The Climate Coalition for the annual Show the Love celebration! Every year around Valentine's Day, we get together to really put our hearts into fighting climate change.


Show the Love is all about protecting the things we love but could lose to climate change. It's part of the ongoing effort to stand up for the people and places we love by demanding that our leaders make the switch to clean energy and by honoring everyday activists who are making that switch a reality.

Here are five ways you can join us and show the love this February:

1. Download a free #ShowTheLove Valentine's Day postcard. Print one out and send it to your representatives and elected officials to show the love for our planet, and call for climate action.

2. Make a green heart!! Get crafty with your kids or over wine with your friends. Green hearts will be popping up all over on Valentine's Day—make your own special heart and post it on social media using #ShowTheLove.

3. Take the quiz and find out: What kind of climate activist are you? Every one of us brings something different and important to the climate movement. So what kind of activist are you? Click here to take the quiz and we'll tell you!

4. Learn the basics of climate change. In this free-e-book, we outline the fundamentals of climate change in plain language, provide tips on how to take action, and list additional helpful resources. Whether you're learning about the climate crisis for the first time or simply need a refresher, Climate Crisis 101 is a great way to get started.

5. Share a green heart graphic. Help us build awareness about climate change on social media by sharing the graphic below on Facebook or Twitter (make sure to include #ShowTheLove).

Have more ideas or unique ways to join in? Let us know! Tweet @ClimateReality and tell us how you're going to #ShowTheLove. No matter how you choose to take part, we hope you can join in and speak out for climate action this Valentine's Day.

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