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EcoWatch Earth Day Photo Contest

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Update: The window for photo submissions has ended. The winner will be announced this Monday, April 22.

EcoWatch is pleased to announce its second photo contest! Earth Day is happening on April 22nd, and this year's theme is "Protect Our Species." With that in mind, we want EcoWatchers to show us your photographs of creatures that inhabit Earth. Send us your best photos of species you value.


Submit your photo to bautista@ecowatch.com with the subject line "ECOWATCH EARTH DAY PHOTO CONTEST" by April 15th for a chance to win a $250 Patagonia eGift Card and to have your photo appear on EcoWatch.com. To be considered, submit your photo with the following information:

  1. Name
  2. Email
  3. Phone Number
  4. Photo Submission file (.jpeg file format recommended)
  5. Caption

Our judges will choose the winning photo and the winner will be announced on Earth Day, April 22nd. One submission per person.

All submissions will be evaluated by our panel of judges, who will be announced very soon!

By entering this photo contest you are granting EcoWatch the right to use your photo on our site and our media channels in conjunction with this contest without the written permission of the photographer. Unless otherwise instructed, EcoWatch reserves the right to use photo submissions on our site and in our media channels aside from the contest. If you do not wish to give EcoWatch the rights to use your photo aside from the current photo contest that you are participating in, please let us know within your email submission with the text, "No, I do not want to give EcoWatch the rights to use my photos in other media aside from the current photo contest that I am participating in."

More Contest Details:

Entry Details

  • Photo submissions must be original work taken by the contest entrant.
  • By entering this photo contest you are granting EcoWatch the right to use your photo on our site and our media channels in conjunction with this contest without the written permission of the photographer.
  • Unless otherwise instructed, EcoWatch reserves the right to use photo submissions on our site and in our media channels aside from the contest.
  • The winner's name will be announced alongside the winning photo submission.
  • Photos that have already been submitted to other contests currently ongoing or have already won prizes in other contests are not eligible.
  • Image files created through any device capable of taking still images, such as smartphones and digital still cameras, will be accepted.
  • Color and monochrome images are valid for entry.
  • After judging concludes, the winners will be notified by email sent to their listed email address by April 22nd. The Patagonia eGift Card will be sent to the same listed email address.

Disclaimers

  • EcoWatch reserves the right to void entries that depict brand logos or other intellectual property, whether on electronic signs, posters, or in other forms, or that in its judgment are harmful to public order, go against standards of decency, or are conflicting to the goals of the contest.
  • EcoWatch is not responsible for the resolution of legal issues arising from the entrants submitted photos and will not pay any costs thereby incurred.
  • EcoWatch does not bear any costs to the entrants that incur by entering the contest.
  • Submitted entries may not be withdrawn or returned.
  • EcoWatch reserves the right to suspend or postpone the receipt of any or all entries if it is judged that the contest is unable to be run effectively, smoothly, or without affecting the fairness of judging.

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